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Deans' Seminar

Complete list of past seminars (excel file)

Deans' Seminar Series 2016-17

Sessions will be held in the UCET Classroom (NS245) at noon (before or after the Academic Senate meeting) unless otherwise noted.

Drinks will be available; please feel free to bring your lunch.

2016-17 Series

September 16, 2016 Mohammad Merhi, Assistant Professor of Decision Science
The Impact of Task Dissonance and Organizational Punishment on Workers Compliance with Information Systems Security Policies

October 21, 2016 Micheline Nilsen, Professor of Art History
The Early French Environmentalists

November 18, 2016 Kathy Doerscher
The History and Impact of the Low Fat Diet

February 17, 2017 Chu He, Assistant Professor of English
Trauma Studies and Modern Irish Drama

March 24, 2017 Andrea Rusnock, Associate Professor of Art History
Stitching Russia: Women and Needlework in the Late Russian Empire

April 21, 2017 Jennifer Muniz, Assistant Professor of Music
The First Chicago Composers: Sounds of the Gilded Age

 

ABSTRACTS

September 16, 2016 Mohammad Merhi, Assistant Professor of Decision Science
The Impact of Task Dissonance and Organizational Punishment on Workers Compliance with Information Systems Security Policies

This research investigates information systems security compliance in organizations with the focus on workers’ behavior. Workers’ non-compliance with information systems security policies has been identified as a major threat to organizational data and information systems. The proposed research framework is influenced by the Cognitive Dissonance Theory and the General Deterrence Theory. This research introduces and defines a new construct called “task dissonance.” In doing so, it bridges an important gap in existing literature. Research on information security compliance has examined several factors and theories from many reference disciplines; however no study has defined and assessed this concept. The fact that information security policies increase the task complexity creates a mental dissonance in workers which negatively affects their compliance behavior. Organizational punishment factors, namely certainty of control and severity, are also examined in this research. This research is guided by positivist paradigm. Hypotheses are tested and validated using established quantitative approaches, namely data collection using survey and ANOVA analytical procedures. Major findings are derived from this research that are significant for both academia and practice.


October 21, 2016 Micheline Nilsen, Professor of Art History
The Early French Environmentalists

France is usually considered to have responded to environmental concerns later than other European countries. However, forest and water management was a primary concerns for the pre-Revolutionary monarchy. After the Revolution, a School of Forestry was founded in 1824 and a post-Napoleonic forest code promulgated in 1827. A number of figures active during the Paris Commune of 1871 and in France’s colonial territorial management published environment-related writings. After World War II, two naturalists were active participants in the work of an international community of scientists striving to bring environmental matters to the foreground. This work eventually led to the creation of a Ministry of the Environment in 1971, and the development of a Green political faction.  Although France’s environmental thinking developed differently from that of Anglo-Saxon countries, a steady track record of environmental thinking reveals a country conscious of man’s impact on an ecologically compromised planet.


November 18, 2016 Kathy Doerscher
The History and Impact of the Low Fat Diet

In the mid 30’s, a dentist by the name of Weston A. Price documented his research, and observations regarding the importance of eating whole food, and the degeneration and destruction that comes from a diet of processed foods (Price, 1939).  Price traveled to over 14 countries and noticed that people living in primitive conditions lacked much of the dental disease that civilized modern cultures were experiencing. Price spent over 10 years documenting the negative health effects caused by consuming processed foods (1939). Isolated communities had diets that were high in animal-based saturated fat and seafood, with a limited amount of grains.  He attributed their lack of dental decay and their excellent physical health to the nutrient dense food they consumed (Price).  Cognitive disturbances were also noted amongst children being raised with a modern diet as they demonstrated a lower intelligence quotient (IQ) in school (Price). 

At the same time that Price was performing his research, Ancel Keys, an American scientist who was working for the United States Army developed the first K-rations or portable nonperishable foods to sustain soldiers in the field.  Despite Price’s work, Keys advocated a low-fat diet for the prevention of heart disease, a growing concern of the day (Keys et al., 1966).  In 1977 the USDA endorsed Keys low fat diet and the first Dietary Guidelines for Americans was established.  This caused and an influx of low-fat, processed foods in the American diet which soon became a staple. Since this endorsement there has been a devastating increase in the incidence of obesity, diabetes and other metabolic disorders and heart disease is still the number one cause of death in developed countries.

 Price, W. A., & Price. (1939). Nutrition and physical degeneration. La Mesa, CA: Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation.

Keys, A., Aravanis, C., Blackburn, H., Van Buchem, F. Buzina, R. Djordjević, BA.,Taylor, H. (1966). Epidemiological studies related to coronary heart disease: characteristics of men aged 40-59 in Seven Countries. Acta Medica Scandinavica Supplementum, 460, 1-392. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ pubmed/5226858


February 17, 2017 Chu He, Assistant Professor of English
Trauma Studies and Modern Irish Drama


March 24, 2017 Andrea Rusnock, Associate Professor of Art History
Stitching Russia: Women and Needlework in the Late Russian Empire


April 21, 2017 Jennifer Muniz, Assistant Professor of Music
The First Chicago Composers: Sounds of the Gilded Age

The contributions of Chicago composers in the late nineteenth century, partly due to the fact of the location in the Midwest, fell in the shadows of the more well-known work of the Second New England School, based on the East Coast. My research sheds light on the music of these Chicago composers, a subgroup of American music, and their roles in the broader developing musical scene of the United States during the Gilded Age. 

Similar to the profound cultural influence that the Universal Exposition in Paris of 1889 exerted on composers such as Debussy (who first heard Indonesian gamelan music at the exposition), the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair had international implications. For instance, the music at the Haitian Pavilion brought African-American vernacular music such as ragtime to a world stage. The fact that this monumental event was held in Chicago, as opposed to Boston or New York, was an important step in legitimizing Chicago’s artistic status. Works of Chicagoan Frederick Grant Gleason (1848-1903) were presented at the Fair, and also at the opening of the Chicago Auditorium in 1889 (Chicago’s “Carnegie Hall”). 

Arne Oldberg (1874-1962), a student of Gleason, was a composer and pianist who wrote an exceptional body of solo piano music, several concertos, chamber music, and orchestral music that was regularly performed by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. His influence is felt through important students he taught at Northwestern University, such as Margaret Bonds and Howard Hanson (director of the renowned Eastman School of Music from 1924-1964). Oldberg's music exemplifies the American Romantic style of the early twentieth century. This presentation examines cultural and musical influences on Chicago composers at that time, and will feature listening examples of selected composers’ works, including those of Oldberg and Gleason.