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Deans' Seminar

Complete list of past seminars (excel file)

Deans' Seminar Series 2016-17

Sessions will be held in the UCET Classroom (NS245) at noon (before or after the Academic Senate meeting) unless otherwise noted.

Drinks will be available; please feel free to bring your lunch.

2016-17 Series

September 16, 2016 Mohammad Merhi, Assistant Professor of Decision Science
The Impact of Task Dissonance and Organizational Punishment on Workers Compliance with Information Systems Security Policies

October 21, 2016 Micheline Nilsen, Professor of Art History
The Early French Environmentalists

November 18, 2016 Kathy Doerscher
The History and Impact of the Low Fat Diet

February 17, 2017 Chu He, Assistant Professor of English
Trauma Studies and Modern Irish Drama

March 24, 2017 Andrea Rusnock, Associate Professor of Art History
Stitching Russia: Women and Needlework in the Late Russian Empire

April 21, 2017 Jennifer Muniz, Assistant Professor of Music
The First Chicago Composers: Sounds of the Gilded Age

 

ABSTRACTS

September 16, 2016 Mohammad Merhi, Assistant Professor of Decision Science
The Impact of Task Dissonance and Organizational Punishment on Workers Compliance with Information Systems Security Policies

This research investigates information systems security compliance in organizations with the focus on workers’ behavior. Workers’ non-compliance with information systems security policies has been identified as a major threat to organizational data and information systems. The proposed research framework is influenced by the Cognitive Dissonance Theory and the General Deterrence Theory. This research introduces and defines a new construct called “task dissonance.” In doing so, it bridges an important gap in existing literature. Research on information security compliance has examined several factors and theories from many reference disciplines; however no study has defined and assessed this concept. The fact that information security policies increase the task complexity creates a mental dissonance in workers which negatively affects their compliance behavior. Organizational punishment factors, namely certainty of control and severity, are also examined in this research. This research is guided by positivist paradigm. Hypotheses are tested and validated using established quantitative approaches, namely data collection using survey and ANOVA analytical procedures. Major findings are derived from this research that are significant for both academia and practice.


October 21, 2016 Micheline Nilsen, Professor of Art History

The Early French Environmentalists


November 18, 2016 Kathy Doerscher
The History and Impact of the Low Fat Diet


February 17, 2017 Chu He, Assistant Professor of English
Trauma Studies and Modern Irish Drama


March 24, 2017 Andrea Rusnock, Associate Professor of Art History
Stitching Russia: Women and Needlework in the Late Russian Empire


April 21, 2017 Jennifer Muniz, Assistant Professor of Music
The First Chicago Composers: Sounds of the Gilded Age

The contributions of Chicago composers in the late nineteenth century, partly due to the fact of the location in the Midwest, fell in the shadows of the more well-known work of the Second New England School, based on the East Coast. My research sheds light on the music of these Chicago composers, a subgroup of American music, and their roles in the broader developing musical scene of the United States during the Gilded Age. 

Similar to the profound cultural influence that the Universal Exposition in Paris of 1889 exerted on composers such as Debussy (who first heard Indonesian gamelan music at the exposition), the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair had international implications. For instance, the music at the Haitian Pavilion brought African-American vernacular music such as ragtime to a world stage. The fact that this monumental event was held in Chicago, as opposed to Boston or New York, was an important step in legitimizing Chicago’s artistic status. Works of Chicagoan Frederick Grant Gleason (1848-1903) were presented at the Fair, and also at the opening of the Chicago Auditorium in 1889 (Chicago’s “Carnegie Hall”). 

Arne Oldberg (1874-1962), a student of Gleason, was a composer and pianist who wrote an exceptional body of solo piano music, several concertos, chamber music, and orchestral music that was regularly performed by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. His influence is felt through important students he taught at Northwestern University, such as Margaret Bonds and Howard Hanson (director of the renowned Eastman School of Music from 1924-1964). Oldberg's music exemplifies the American Romantic style of the early twentieth century. This presentation examines cultural and musical influences on Chicago composers at that time, and will feature listening examples of selected composers’ works, including those of Oldberg and Gleason.