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Undergraduate Course Descriptions Fall 2012

English Majors and Advisors may download a Sample Program of Study here.

 
ENG-A 190 — Arts, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.)
4565     MW  10:00-11:15 A         Clayton Michaels
Topic: Completely Unreadable: The Art of Imitating Experimental Literature
In this class, we will spend our time trying to create ‘experimental’ literature. We will start by looking at several examples of ‘experimental’ fiction, poetry, film, and even a graphic novel in order to explore what it means to call something ‘experimental.’ Students will then ‘imitate’ the authors we have read in order to produce their own ‘experimental’ fiction, poetry, and short graphic novel.
 
 
ENG-A 190 — Arts, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.)
4566  MW  11:30-12:45 P      Margaret Chapman
Topic:  Art of Imitation: myths and Fairytales 
            Contemporary literature is full of re-tellings and re-imaginings, from Margaret Atwood’s The Penelopiad to Seth Grahame-Smith’s Pride And Prejudice and Zombies, but this isn’t a new phenomenon–writers, including Shakespeare and Mark Twain, have always recycle plots and characters from other's works. In this class, we’ll explore writing stories and poems by retelling, recycling and re-imagining oft-told tales and discover how writers take familiar material and make it both new and personal as we look at contemporary examples of re-tellings in fiction, poetry and graphic novels.  We'll also discuss how re-telling relates to issues of intellectual property and originality.  Students will research myths and fairytales, write a brief analysis of one published reinterpretation, and write and revise a portfolio of creative work.   The class will also create an online literary journal of their work.
 
 
ENG-A 190 — Arts, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.)
5414  TR  1:00-2:15 P      Clayton Michaels
Topic:  Completely Unreadable: The Art of Imitating Experimental Literature
In this class, we will spend our time trying to create ‘experimental’ literature. We will start by looking at several examples of ‘experimental’  fiction, poetry, film, and even a graphic novel in order to explore what it means to call something ‘experimental.’ Students will then ‘imitate’ the authors we have read in order to produce their own ‘experimental’ fiction, poetry, and short graphic novel.
 
 
ENG-A 190 — Arts, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.)
4962  TR  4:00-5:15 P      Margaret Chapman
Topic:  Art of Imitation: myths and Fairytales 
            Contemporary literature is full of re-tellings and re-imaginings, from Margaret Atwood’s The Penelopiad to Seth Grahame-Smith’s Pride And Prejudice and Zombies, but this isn’t a new phenomenon–writers, including Shakespeare and Mark Twain, have always recycle plots and characters from other's works. In this class, we’ll explore writing stories and poems by retelling, recycling and re-imagining oft-told tales and discover how writers take familiar material and make it both new and personal as we look at contemporary examples of re-tellings in fiction, poetry and graphic novels.  We'll also discuss how re-telling relates to issues of intellectual property and originality.  Students will research myths and fairytales, write a brief analysis of one published reinterpretation, and write and revise a portfolio of creative work.   The class will also create an online literary journal of their work.
 
 
ENG-A 399 — Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.)
31197  MW  2:30-3:45 P      Margaret Chapman
Topic:  Surrealism and Narrative Collage 
              The writer Donald Barthelme once said, “the point of collage is that things are stuck together to create a new reality.” In this class we will create and collect “things”—memories, texts, photos, objects, images—and stick them together to tell stories and create new realities. We’ll study many examples of literary and visual collage as we explore new ways to tell stories. Students will maintain an ongoing collage journal to practice techniques and experiment with ideas, and will complete 3 major projects of narrative collage, including a complete, self-published book. To provide an historical and interdisciplinary framework, we’ll study the key twentieth century artistic movements that experimented with collage. In particular we’ll investigate the European Surrealists, taking a closer look at their finished products and participating in their creative processes, and the influence of European Surrealism and collage on North and South American artists and writers.  
 
ENG-A 399 — Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.)
4994  TR 10:00-11:15 A      Nancy Botkin
Topic:  I, Me, Mine:  Representations of the Self in Poetry and Collage
The lyric “I” is alive and well in contemporary American poetry, with some poets embracing the confessional mode and others engaging in lyric forms that reflect a new selfhood, one that concerns itself less with sincerity and attempts to convey personal story in a more fragmented way, driven by the artifice of language.  Ever since Whitman announced “I celebrate myself,” poets have been negotiating the deeper concerns of autobiographical poetry, of truth-telling and authorial responsibility.  We’ll look at several contemporary poets who represent various degrees of confession, and students will write their own portfolio of “autobiographical”  poems.  Visual artists’ work, too, by the turn of the 20th century, began moving away from traditional, representational art to more abstract forms, notably collage. We’ll look at many collage artists and collage techniques and make collages for the purpose of personal expression. Although collage is by definition a fragmented form, like poetry, there are various degrees of accessibility and you will explore the possibilities of putting images together with a sense of adventure while paying attention to various elements of form.  Projects, reflective papers, quizzes, and daily collage journal.
 
 
ENG-E 110 – Diversity in Literature (3 cr.)     Benjamin Balthaser
5490  MW  2:30-2:45 P
This course proposes that we examine ethnic diversity and gender in United States through the lens of culture.  While often racial and gender identity are seen as static – one is "born" a particular race, ethnicity, or gender that does not change -- race and gender are as often fluid sites of contest and question:  What does it mean to be an American?  Who is to be included or excluded? Who is an immigrant and who is an alien?  Whose history gets to be told and by whom?  Whose stories do we hear on the television, in theaters, or on the radio?  Does being Black, or Jewish, Latino/a or White mean the same thing it did a century ago, and who gets to define what these identities mean?  Often culture is the realm in which these questions and others like them are posed, debated, challenged, and occasionally even legislated.  Over the span of the semester, we'll examine films, novels, poems, and music from the New Deal coalition to the Beat Generation, from the U.S.-Vietnam War to globalization and immigration.  For all texts, we'll ask how writers and artists reimagined the national culture along the lines of racial, gendered, and ethnic belonging.
 
 
ENG-E 301 — Literatures in English to 1600 (3 cr.)
3711  TR  11:30-12:45 P     Bobby Meyer-Lee
What do a cannibalistic monster, nihilistically corrupt preacher, and cross-dressing female knight destined to save a damsel-in-distress (from having her heart torn out of her chest on a nightly basis) all have in common?  They are among the treasures of what is, upon close inspection, the truly strange legacy of early British literature.  In this course, we will seek to recover this strangeness from literary texts that have long been considered canonical (such as Beowulf, Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s The Faerie Queen, Shakespeare’s Othello, and many others), as well as engage with less well-known ones.  We will pay a good deal of attention to the historical contexts of these texts (cultural, social, political, religious, linguistic), not simply to help understand them but also to cast into relief the tensions and contradictions of their times, which they both reflect and contribute to.  The course will be a survey, but we will thread together our readings with recurring considerations, such as:  What counts as literary?  What good is literature?  What is the relation of literary production to political power?  How does literature both enforce and resist gender norms?  Can literature save the soul, or does it put it in jeopardy?
 
 
ENG-E 304 — Literatures in English 1900-Present (3 cr.)
3712  MW  2:30-3:45 P     Chu He
 Representative study of various literatures written in English in twentieth century. Focus on themes associated with shared cultures and concerns. Selections may include writers from Virginia Woolf and E. M. Forster to Chinua Achebe and Anita Desai.
 
 
 
 
ENG-G 205 — Intro to the English Language (3 cr.)
3716  MW  10:00-11:15 A     Mary Anna Violi
Elementary phonetics, phonology, and grammatical analysis: historical and comparative linguistics: language variation; English language as considered in relation to other languages.
 
 
ENG-L 202 — Literary Interpretation (3 cr.)
3717  MW  5:30-6 :45 P     Kyoko Takanashi
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts, theories, and methodologies that inform literary study.  Course activities will be based on readings in a variety of genres including poetry, fiction, and drama.  We will discuss not only the content of these texts (What does the text mean? What does the text say?), but also the formal properties of the texts (How does the text say what it says?) and representative critical approaches (How might we make meaning out of this text using the critical approach of historicism/feminism/Marxism/etc.?).   Students will practice analyzing literary texts in a sophisticated and developed manner through class discussion and writing assignments.
 
 
ENG-L 202 — Literary Interpretation (3 cr.)
3718  TR  2:30-3 :45 P     Karen Gindele
This course is an introduction to interpreting literature, and we’ll read English and American drama, poetry, and fiction.  We’ll pay attention to how forms of literature themselves shape meaning—how a writer might use a poem as the form in which to define an experience or perception, while he or she might use a play to present social interactions in dialogue or a novel to show us how an imagined person grows up or people fall in love.  We’ll consider how writers adhere to or depart from the conventions or rules for the various genres, and we’ll work at mastering the concepts and terms that literary analysis entails.  We will try to evaluate the choices writers make in what they include in their imagined worlds and how they represent those worlds, from their language, “ordinary” and figurative, to their characters, plots, themes, and ideas. Our format will be discussion, and there will be four formal interpretive papers mainly of medium length (4-5 pp.) as well as frequent informal reading response papers.  Students will have small research assignments to develop skill in incorporating other critical perspectives and to aim for complexity and detail in analysis. Second-level writing.
 
 
ENG-L 207 — Women and Literature (3 cr.)
5016  MW  1:00-2 :15 P     Jake Mattox
(combined with WGS-L 207/5033)
Topic:  The Literatures of Protest
This course will offer a selected survey of U.S. women’s protest writing from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Course materials will include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, film, and autobiographical writings. We will investigate how different genres and forms of “literature,” broadly conceived, are used strategically to enact direct and/or implicit critiques of social, political, and cultural conditions. We will also examine how questions of gender affect key issues in women’s (and men’s) writing, from access to publishing to expectations about genre and form. Authors and works studied will likely include Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin; Harriet Jacobs’s slave narrative; Ida Wells’s essays on lynching; Muriel Rukeyser’s activist poetry; Miné Okubo’s Citizen 13660, an illustrated account of life in Japanese internment camps; fiction about migrant laborers in the Southwest; poetry of the Black Power movement; Angela Davis’s essays on prison, race, and gender; and Anna Deavere Smith’s Twilight: Los Angeles, a multi-perspective account of the 1992 Los Angeles Rebellion written for the theater.
 
 
ENG-L 222 — Intro to Literary Criticism (3 cr.)
32087  MW  1:00-2 :15 P     Karen Gindele
Current literary and cultural theory is composed of works from many disciplines which we, as critics, use to analyze and evaluate the content, form, and language of imaginative literature.  The main purpose of this course is to introduce you to such theories; I’ll have to assume that you have a fairly developed knowledge of the concerns and methods of the study of literature such as you might get in L202, Literary Interpretation.  We’ll read some of the founding texts of Marxist theory, psychoanalysis, feminism, race relations theory, a bit of colonial and postcolonial theory, deconstruction, and poststructuralism, and we’ll read literary criticism which uses these theories.  We’ll focus especially on theories of identity determined by gender, class, and race, both in psychoanalytic and broader cultural terms, and on an individual person’s relation to power and the social order.  We’ll start out applying some analytical theories to poetry and then to three novels.   There will be three papers (one short and two of medium length (5 pp.) in which students will use theories to analyze the literary texts.  The class will operate primarily by discussion, and students themselves, in small groups, will lead a discussion once during the semester.
 
 
ENG-L 290 — Children’s Literature (3 cr.)
31195  MW  4:00-5 :15 P     Smiljka Cubelic
This course challenges students to develop as critical readers and “informed critics”  who engage in serious, meaningful, and structured discussion of children’s literature from intellectual, moral, and aesthetic point of view. A portfolio system is based on the checklist of semester-long assignments which are designed to develop your analytical skills in a gradual manner.
 
 
ENG-L 350 — Early American Writing and Culture 1800 (3 cr.)
32089  TR  11:30-12:45 P     Jake Mattox
This course offers an introduction to the writings and key contextual issues of the pre-colonial, colonial, and revolutionary eras in North America. We will read broadly to gain an understanding of the multiplicity of voices and texts coming into contact with one another, from Native American oral culture to the writings of the Spanish, French, Puritans, and Africans in the Americas. We will also examine a variety of genres central to the development of an “American” literature, such as the captivity narrative (the salacious best-sellers of the day featuring violence, kidnapping, and sexual desire), the conversion narrative, the sermon, and early poetry. These texts cover a rich variety of topics and concerns, including the relationship of “settler” to “native,” the construction of ideas of innate difference between the two, contests over cultural authority, the development of concepts of the natural world, early national self-definition, and the exploration of enlightenment ideals of human rationality, rights, and democratic government.
 
 
ENG-L 379 — American Ethnic & Minority Lit (3 cr.)   Benjamin Balthaser
5017  MW  5:30-6:45 P     
Topic:  Racial Formation and American Citizenship
From America's inception through the present moment, race and ethnicity shape foundational contours of citizenship, nationhood, and the production of social identity. Literature plays a key role for communities of color to challenge and fashion U.S. identity though the cultural power of the printed word. From 19th century slave narratives to Malcolm X’s Autobiography, from Jewish immigrant writers of the 19th century to contemporary Chicana writers, the literature we'll read in this course allows readers to engage with important voices of critique, new states of belonging and forms of citizenship, and provides documents in the on-going struggles for equality.  Authors may include (but not be limited to) Frederick Douglass, Abraham Cahan, Richard Wright, Helena Viramontes, Malcolm X, Sherman Alexie, James Baldwin, Zora Neal Huston, and Hisaye Yamamoto.  In addition, we’ll watch silent film, examine paintings by Aaron Douglas and Jacob Lawrence, and read critical texts by theorists such as Omi and Winant and Stuart Hall.
 
 
ENG-L 381 — Recent Writing (3 cr.) becoming L382    Anne Magnan-Park
5018  TR  10:00-11:15 A     
Topic:  Fiction of the Non-Western World
Magic realism is a term that has been used to describe fiction that seamlessly incorporates supernatural elements in an otherwise realistic setting. This course will address the fiction emanating from Latin America and the Pacific with a focus on magical realism. We will explore the relationship between history (oral and written), mythology, and fiction by studying novels, short stories, and essays by authors from Colombia, Mexico, New Zealand, and Samoa, such as Gabriel García Márquez, Laura Esquivel, Patricia Grace, Witi Ihimaera, and Albert Wendt.
 
 
ENG-L 460 — Seminar : Literary Form, Mode, and Theme (3 cr.)
5415  R  5 :30-8 :00 P     Chu He
Topic: Colonial and Postcolonial Writings
This course will explore Anglophone writings in colonial and postcolonial period, including but not limited to Irish, Caribbean, Indian,African literary works in English. We will read works about colonial encounters that deal with colonial exploitation and cruelty, nationalism, and war of independence as well as works about postcolonial encounters that address decolonization, diaspora, and nation-building. Meanwhile, we will also study postcolonial theories such as works by Frantz Fanon, Edward W. Said, Homi K. Bhabha, Stuart Hall, David Lloyd, and others, which provide a theoretical framework for our understanding and analysis of literary works and equip us intellectually to discuss key issues of identity, displacement, hybridity, homelessness, etc. in (post)colonial encounters.  As a senior seminar, this course aims to develop students’ ability to apply theory to literary works, to perform literary research, and to write more sophisticated and nuanced literary criticism.
 
 
 
 
ENG-T 190 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
5020  MW  1 :00-2 :15 P     Kate Wolford
Topic:  Fractured Fairy Tale Families              
 Fairy tales usually take place inside the family (“Cinderella”) or after ejection from a family (Snow White”). If the parents or siblings in a story are not mean or incompetent (“Hansel and Gretel”  and “Puss in Boots”), they are often intensely evil (“The Juniper Tree”). Power struggles inside fairy tale families, in both high and low places, are then, power generators for fairy tale plot development.  In “Fractured Fairy Tale Families,” we will examine not only the appeal of failed families in the stories and the reasons for their appeal, but also ponder the central ethical problem in fairy tales: Are they inherently a bad form of storytelling? Is there something in their core that appeals to such base stereotyping – evil stepparents, plotting siblings, the inherent good of the physically beautiful – that people will, despite our best efforts to retell stories in new, modern, more morally generous ways, usually support the most base and basic forms of the tales? The course really will ask a question that may seem too extreme, but in my years of teaching about fairy tales always ends up as the central question: Should we even tell these stories anymore?
 
 
ENG-T 190 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
5019   MW  5 :30-6 :45 P     Benjamin Balthaser
Topic: Labor and Literature
As William Faulkner once said “you can't eat for eight hours a day nor drink for eight hours a day....all you can do for eight hours is work….”.  And yet work and those who perform it are often invisible, lacking both cultural and political representation on the national and world stage. This class will explore what it means to work in the United States, looking at the way labor shapes questions of personal and collective identity, the terrain of citizenship, the meaning of gender and race, as well as the way labor has been used to construct and contest a national identity. In addition, we'll look at the ways individual artists and writers from the late19th century to the present sought to represent work and the ways they have engaged in political and cultural movements to change how Americans experience working and viewing/being/becoming working-class.  Texts will include novels, poetry, films, philosophical writings, oral history, and 1st person testimonials all of which pose as central to their quest for meaning:  what is the meaning of labor in the United States?
 
 
ENG-T 190 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
5530  TR  1 :00-2 :15 P     Anne Magnan-Park
Topic: Signed, the Land of the Long White Cloud
New Zealand is increasingly called by its indigenous Māori name, Aotearoa, the land of the long white cloud, referring back to Māori mythology according to which the explorer Kupe and his crew discovered the North Island thanks to the long cloud that permanently hung over it. The existence of a bilingual name for a single country betrays some of the tensions at play in the emergence and establishment of New Zealand’s national identity along a binary divide between the indigenous Māori population and the Pākehā (European) settler. This course foregrounds the rise and establishment of New Zealand’s political, cultural, and literary, independence from Great Britain through the study of the distinctive stylistic traits of signature Kiwi authors and film directors of both Māori and Pākehā decent.
This course is an introduction to New Zealand literature and cinema. No previous knowledge of New Zealand is required or assumed. You will become familiar with the works of at least three major authors (Janet Frame, Patricia Grace, and Witi Ihimaera) and two signature film directors (Peter Jackson and Niki Caro), as well as the critical discourses they have inspired.
 
 
ENG-T 190 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
4592  TR  4 :00-5 :15 P                  ELKHART        Jackie Collins
Topic:  Stories of the Dysfunctional Family
The course focuses on the repetitive pattern of dysfunction in family groups from the ancient Greeks to modern writers. The class will analyze the causes of socially dysfunctional actions and the effects on family members and the surrounding society. We’ll study dysfunctional characters in literary works and film with the help of some psychological texts. We will examine the difficulty of breaking out of dysfunction and investigate ethical consequences of characters’ actions. How are the destructive consequences of dysfunctional acts treated by the authors in this course? How does modern society view such acts? Can dysfunctional acts be explained away by fate or birth? Where does responsibility reside?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ENG-T 191 — World Literary & Intellectual Traditions  I (3 cr.)
4672  TR  1 :00-2 :15 P     Bobby Meyer-Lee
Priority given to Education students
Topic: Heroes in Ancient and Medieval World Literature
Three boys without a father:  one finds a sword in a stone, one is given a light saber, and one is chosen by a wand.  All become heroes.  The significance of these and many other similarities among such tales of heroes—as well as of their important differences—is the topic of this course.  The focus, in particular, will be on heroic legends from the ancient and medieval eras, ranging across time and space from 4000 years ago in Mesopotamia (Gilgamesh), to 2500 years ago in India (the life of the Buddha), to 500 years ago in England (Sir Thomas Malory’s account of King Arthur).  Throughout, we will reflect on apparent continuities among these stories as well as the vast differences in culture that they carry, and we will think about the cultural functions of heroic legends in general.  And, yes, we will also talk about how the Star Wars and Harry Potter sagas fit into the long tradition of heroic literature.
 
 
ENG-T 390 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
4832  MW  4 :00-5 :15 P             Karen Gindele
Topic:  Love & Work in the 19th Century Novel
This course will examine the conditions and relationships of love and work in two English novels and some Russian short fiction.  Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South and Thomas Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd will form the center of the course, with short stories by Anton Chekhov rounding out the course. We will read some works critiquing the system of labor organized by class and gender divisions and the institution of marriage, and concurrent political and social theory such as Marx’s Communist Manifesto and Thorstein Veblen’s The Theory of the Leisure Class. We’ll also read philosophical essays on love, and we’ll examine the influence of work and love on each other, one often limiting the other despite the increasing social possibility (and occasional fact) at least for the middle class, of being able to choose a spouse and/or profession. The class will operate primarily by discussion and there will probably be three formal interpretive essays that ask students to use some combination of the political and philosophical theories to analyze the relationship of love and work in the novels.  One of the papers will require independent research, and there will be several short informal response papers on the readings as well.
 
 
ENG-T 390 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
4915  TR  1 :00-2 :15 P             Lee Kahan
Topic:   Literature of the Commercial Revolution
In the early eighteenth-century, the novelist Daniel Defoe proclaimed that England had become “a nation of shopkeepers.” While Defoe might have been a bit premature, it was certainly the case that over the course of the century, England transitioned from an agricultural to a commercial economy.  Defoe meant his remark as a compliment, but others were not so sure that this change was a positive one, given how it had unsettled many of the assumptions upon which personal identity was based.  Money, for example, was quickly replacing birth as the basis for power and prestige: “I can buy a gentleman, therefore I am a gentleman,” as one shopkeeper of the time put it.  While this produced a new sense of social equality (an evil more than a good for many), it also suggested that one’s identity was based on what one owned rather than on any inherent attributes (soul, personality, etc.). A new luxury market promoted this mentality by offering a wider array of goods than ever before and invented new techniques, such as advertisements and window displays, to make these goods appealing. The result was a new type of individual—“the consumer”—who seemed to lack any fixed identity, or indeed any substance at all. In this class, we will examine how England responded to the crisis of identity wrought by the commercial revolution and how the literature of the time attempted to offer solutions to this crisis, helping to naturalize the modern individual of capitalism in the process. Novels will include: Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Tobias Smollett, Humphrey Clinker; Henry McKenzie, The Man of Feeling; and Frances Burney, Evelina. The main assignments for the course will be one short paper (4+ pages), a research paper (8+ pages), and a take-home exam.
 
 
ENG-T 390 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
4833  TR  2 :30-3 :45 P             Kyoko Takanashi
Topic: Monsters of Modernity
In this course, we will read some classic “monster” literature to investigate how monsters function in the literary imagination as touchstones for exploring the essence and the boundaries of humanity.  What if monsters are scary, not because they are different from us but because they are strangely similar to us?  Which is more terrifying, to be attacked by a monster or to turn into one?  Does modern science risk producing monsters in the attempt to enhance the human experience, or can technology help us fight monsters that threaten us?  By the end of the semester, I hope you will begin to see that horror films and novels are part of our culture’s responses to historically specific developments in science and technology – developments that make us reconsider what it means to be human. Please be informed that this is a writing intensive class.  Writing is integral to literary interpretation because it helps us remember details about the text as well as our own ideas, and encourages us to develop our ideas beyond mere opinion or preference.  We will practice some writing skills using short response papers to help you prepare for writing the three longer papers.
 
 
ENG-W 031 — Pre-Composition (3 cr.) S/F graded
             This course prepares students for college writing at the W130 level by focusing on fundamental writing skills in an academic context; in particular, summary, analysis, and synthesis.  We will study writing as an interpretive act, organization as the logical progression of ideas, and grammar as the effective conveyance of meaning.  Students will learn revision as the thoughtful development of ideas and editing as the direct and accurate presentation of those ideas.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.
 
 
ENG-W 130 — Principles of Composition (3 -4 cr.)
             In this course, students should become more confident as interpreters of college-level reading and will become well-prepared for W131.  Students will also gain a wider range of tools for interpreting academic texts and for developing their ideas in relation to those texts.  We will focus on using summary, analysis, and synthesis to produce thoughtful, organized, theory-driven essays, and will continue to work on organizational strategies and effective language use within that context.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.
 
 
ENG-W 131 — Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
In this course, students will expand their range of strategies for interpreting academic texts, for developing their ideas in relation to those texts, and for expressing those ideas in thoughtful, organized, theory-driven essays, while continuing to work on the effective organization and presentation of those ideas.  W131 addresses these goals at a more challenging level than W130 and includes an introduction to college-level research writing.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.
 
 
ENG-W 203 — Creative Writing (3 cr.)
3782  MW  1:00-2:15 P     Clayton Michaels
             Exploratory course in writing in which students may attempt effective expression in poetry and fiction.
 
 
ENG-W 203 — Creative Writing (3 cr.)
3781  TR  4:00-5:15 P     David Dodd Lee
This class will introduce students to the process and techniques of creative writing, including brainstorming, imitation, and collage techniques in poetry. Students will write both poetry and fiction--starting with the lyric poem, moving along to the prose poem, and ending with the short story. Class readings will expose students to various writing styles and provide examples of successful writing by contemporary poets and fiction writers. Class time will be spent discussing the writer's craft, assigned readings, and student writing.
 
 
ENG-W 231 — Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.)
This course challenges students to explore the distinctive uses of reading and writing as critical thinking and problem-solving methods for a variety of professional fields. Even though this type of writing shares some of the basic skills of organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, and accurate word choices with previous writing classes, it focuses on the process of producing logical and compelling arguments for different professional contexts. Students will work with two portfolios, paragraph development, sentence structure, and accurate word choices with previous writing classes, it focuses on the process of producing logical and compelling arguments for different business contexts. Students will work with two portfolios, one individual and one collaborative, based on two checklists of specific requirements.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.
 
 
ENG-W 232 — Intro to Business Writing ( 3 cr.)
This course challenges students to explore the distinctive uses of reading and writing as critical thinking and problem-solving methods for business organizations. Even though this type of writing shares some of the basic skills of organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, and accurate word choices with previous writing classes, it focuses on the process of producing logical and compelling arguments for different business contexts. Students will work with two portfolios, one individual and one collaborative, based on two checklists of specific requirements.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.
ENG-W 250 — Writing in Context  (3 cr.)
5267  TR  10:00-11:15 A     Diane Economakis
Topic: Literature and Music
This course will explore the ways in which music and literature can overlap, either by using similar techniques or telling a story in various ways.  We will read examples of poetry, prose, and dramatic literature, including excerpts from The Odyssey, Ovid's Metamorphoses, 1001 Arabian Nights.  The final unit will analyze Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream as well as various musical compositions it has inspired.  Although the majority of music we study will be “classical” (orchestral), we will also venture into some more contemporary, popular music as well.  The course will involve a series of short written analyses (1-2 pages each) and three longer essays (6-8 pages each).
 
 
ENG-W 270 — Argumentative Writing (3 cr.)
Priority given to Education students
This course challenges students to explore the distinctive uses of reading and writing as critical thinking and problem-solving methods for business organizations. Even though this type of writing shares some of the basic skills of organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, and accurate word choices with previous writing classes, it focuses on the process of producing logical and compelling arguments for different business contexts. Students will work with two portfolios, one individual and one collaborative, based on two checklists of specific requirements.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.
 
 
ENG-W 303 — Writing Poetry (3 cr.) 
4917  MW  2:30-3:45 P     David Dodd Lee
             This class will be a survey course of contemporary poetry, as well as a workshop. We will examine various narrative structures in an attempt to define the evolution of free verse and how various writers use language in order to subvert solipsism and/or as a sort of bludgeon against cultural sentimentality. We will also look at how various writers transcend the self by moving beyond simple reflections of reality without resorting to fixed forms or received ideas. Further, we will investigate through texts and your own writing how to allow the subconscious to flood the page and how to match your ideas and emotions to an appropriate narrative (or non-narrative) form. Students will write and revise poems of their own (app. 9 for undergrads, 11 for grad students) in an effort to create a thread of coherence that runs through not only single pieces but a small body of work. Students will also keep a reader response journal, write experimental poems based on in-class exercises, and write one (grad students two) informal two page paper on one of our assigned poets (there will be several texts).
 
 
ENG-W 315 — Writing For the Web (3 cr.)
4301   TR  1:00-2:15 P     Ken Smith
 
 
ENG-W 350 — Advanced Expository Writing (3 cr.)
3786  TR  2:30-3:45 P     Rebecca Brittenham
From book reviews to Blogs, from self-discovery to savage critique, the essay continues to be the most flexible, variable, and fun prose form available to writers.  In this class you will be studying some of the great essays of the past and present, taking them apart to see how they work, and adapting some of the techniques you admire into your own essay writing. You will have the opportunity to expand your repertoire as an essayist by trying out various approaches to the essay form—the list, the observational essay, the rantBand by studying conventions of voice, audience, and argument that animate the academic essay. You will also have the opportunity to practice some research techniques and to learn from other writers in a workshop atmosphere.
 
 
ENG-W 401 — Fiction Writing (3 cr.) 
31198  MW  5:30-6:45 P     Margaret Chapman
             The primary focus of this advanced fiction-writing course will be the creation, discussion, and revision of short fiction. We will read contemporary short fiction with a special focus on contemporary forms and the process of writing, including generative systems and restraints. We will also discuss the current literary market and the life of a writer. Students will read and evaluate the fiction of emerging writers in literary journals with an eye toward identifying potential markets for their own work. Assignments will include generative exercises, two complete short stories to be workshopped and revised for the portfolio, and a short essay analyzing a short story that the student has found in a contemporary literary journal.  Students will be encouraged to submit one revised story to a literary journal.
           
 
Comparative Literature
 
CMLT-C 190 — Introduction to Film (3 cr.)
4591  MW  5:30-6:45 P     Amanda Alvarado
This class examines the basic nature of film language through a close analysis of particular films. We will cover film form, film history, film theory, and film genres. This course aims to introduce students to fundamental concepts in film studies and prepare them for more focused courses in film history, aesthetics, and theory.
 
 
CMLT-C 190 — Introduction to Film (3 cr.)
4945  TR  2:30-3:45 P     Andrew DeSelm
This class examines the basic nature of film language through a close analysis of particular films. We will cover film form, film history, film theory, and film genres. This course aims to introduce students to fundamental concepts in film studies and prepare them for more focused courses in film history, aesthetics, and theory.
 
 
CMLT-C 293 — HISTORY OF MOTION PICTURE I (3 cr.)
5015  TR  1:00-2:15 P     Andrew DeSelm
This course studies the evolution of cinema as an institution and art form, moving from the origins of cinema in the late nineteenth century through World War II.  We will cover film movements from the time period, such as French New Wave and Italian Neorealism.  Screenings may include films by Charlie Chaplin (The Gold Rush), Buster Keaton (Sherlock Jr.), and Francois Truffaut (The 400 Blows).
 
 
CMLT-C 297 — Film Genres (3 cr.)
31196  TR  2:30-3:45 P     Elaine Roth
This class investigates the nature, particularly the political nature, of genre films.  We will consider gender and genre, as well as genre cycles.  While we will focus on melodrama, comedy, action and the thriller, students will pursue other genres in their final projects.