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Undergraduate Course Descriptions Fall 2010

Campuswide Gen Ed Common Core

ENG-A 190 — Arts, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.)
9592 MW 2:30-3:45P Clayton Michaels
Topic: Of (Super)Men and Myths: Writing for Comic Books
In this course, we will be taking an intensive look at the mythology of comic books. Students will spend part of the course studying comic books with the same detail with which they would study any other literary form. They will study how comic writers create and refine their own mythologies, like Jeph Loeb does in Batman: The Long Halloween or Brian K. Vaughan does in the first collected volume of his acclaimed Y: The Last Man series. Students will also explore the ways comic writers draw from and re-imagine world mythologies and folk tales in their works, like Mike Mignola’s reworking of Russian folk tales of the Baba Yaga and Koschei the Deathless in Hellboy: Darkness Calls and Neil Gaiman’s blend of Greek, Egyptian, Babylonian and myriad other mythologies in his seminal Sandman series, along with reading some of the original stories these writers are adapting in their books. Students will also spend the semester creating their own comic book, moving from creating their own character(s) and mythologies to plotting their first story arc to scripting and drawing the first issue of their books.

ENG-A 190 — Arts, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.)
9593 MW 5:30-6:45 P Clayton Michaels
Topic: Of (Super)Men and Myths: Writing for Comic Books
In this course, we will be taking an intensive look at the mythology of comic books. Students will spend part of the course studying comic books with the same detail with which they would study any other literary form. They will study how comic writers create and refine their own mythologies, like Jeph Loeb does in Batman: The Long Halloween or Brian K. Vaughan does in the first collected volume of his acclaimed Y: The Last Man series. Students will also explore the ways comic writers draw from and re-imagine world mythologies and folk tales in their works, like Mike Mignola’s reworking of Russian folk tales of the Baba Yaga and Koschei the Deathless in Hellboy: Darkness Calls and Neil Gaiman’s blend of Greek, Egyptian, Babylonian and myriad other mythologies in his seminal Sandman series, along with reading some of the original stories these writers are adapting in their books. Students will also spend the semester creating their own comic book, moving from creating their own character(s) and mythologies to plotting their first story arc to scripting and drawing the first issue of their books.

ENG-A 190 — Arts, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.)
10242 TR 8:30-9:45 A Margaret Chapman
Topic: Exploring Stories and Poems through Imitation

ENG-A 190 — Arts, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.)
10224 TR 4:00-5:15 P David Dodd Lee
Topic: Poetry and Autobiography: The Authenticity of Self in Contemporary Poetry
In this class students will examine their own lives through the prism of “autobiographical” poetry texts (as well as other art forms, including movies, the visual arts, music, etc.) We will examine the idea of poetic "persona" in contemporary poetry by reading various authors, as well as exploring film and visual art, and you will learn through various writing projects, and possibly a visual art project or two, how to determine, in your own autobiographical poems, what you need to do to get the most "truth" out of language through means of concision, music in language, exaggeration, eliminating cliché. The influence of class, gender, and race will all be germane to a deep understanding of how we authentically express and/or build into a complex language construct a representation of the self. You will write imitation poems as well as poems wholly your own. Additionally you will keep a journal of reader responses to the various readings and films, and write 2 short analytical response papers.

ENG-A 399 — Art, Aesthetics, and Creativity (3 cr.)
27226 MW 1:00-2:15 P Kelcey Parker
Topic: Narrative Collage
Narrative has to do with telling stories, and collage is about juxtaposing different images and ideas. The writer Donald Barthelme said, “the point of collage is that things are stuck together to create a new reality.” In this class we will collect “things”—memories, poems, photos, objects, images—and stick them together to tell stories and create new realities. We’ll study many examples of literary and visual collage as we explore new ways to tell stories. Students in this course will write poetry and prose, take photographs, collect objects, and work throughout the semester toward a final project: you will write, design, and self-publish your own book of narrative collage.
Note on content and materials: This course includes advanced reading assignments and reflective writing. Students must have regular access to a camera and should expect to pay up to $20 extra for materials and self-publishing.

ENG-E 301 — Literatures in English to 1600 (3 cr.)
8580 TR 1:00-2:15 P Bobby Meyer-Lee
What do a cannibalistic monster, nihilistically corrupt preacher, and cross-dressing female knight destined to save a damsel-in-distress (from having her heart torn out of her chest on a nightly basis) all have in common? They are among the treasures of what is, upon close inspection, the truly strange legacy of early British literature. In this course, we will seek to recover this strangeness from literary texts that have long been considered canonical (such as Beowulf, Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s The Faerie Queen, Shakespeare’s Othello, and many others), as well as engage with less well-known ones. We will pay a good deal of attention to the historical contexts of these texts (cultural, social, political, religious, linguistic), not simply to help understand them but also to cast into relief the tensions and contradictions of their times, which they both reflect and contribute to. The course will be a survey, but we will thread together our readings with recurring considerations, such as: What counts as literary? What good is literature? What is the relation of literary production to political power? How does literature both enforce and resist gender norms? Can literature save the soul, or does it put it in jeopardy?

ENG-E 304 — Literatures in English 1900-Present (3 cr.)
8581 MW 5:30-6:45 P Chu He
Representative study of various literatures written in English in twentieth century. Focus on themes associated with shared cultures and concerns. Selections may include writers from Virginia Woolf and E. M. Forster to Chinua Achebe and Anita Desai.

ENG-G 205 — Intro to the English Language (3 cr.)
8587 MW 10:00-11:15 A Ann Bridger
8586 TR 4:00-5:15 P
Elementary phonetics, phonology, and grammatical analysis: historical and comparative linguistics: language variation; English language as considered in relation to other languages.
 

ENG-L 202 — Literary Interpretation (3 cr.)
8588 MW 5 :30-6 :45 P Jake Mattox
This course offers an introduction to literary study, including the key terms, concepts, and theories involved in literary interpretation. We will read from a variety of genres, including short stories, poetry, and the novel, with particular attention to both close reading and cultural context. We will also learn about some of the schools of literary interpretation that have sought meaning from texts in different ways. Classes will primarily be centered upon discussion and writing as we explore our own reactions and learn to formulate arguments about a text.

ENG-L 202 — Literary Interpretation (3 cr.)
8589 TR 1 :00-2 :15 P Karen Gindele
This course is an introduction to interpreting literature, and we’ll read English and American drama, poetry, and fiction. We’ll pay attention to how forms of literature themselves shape meaning—how a writer might use a poem as the form in which to define an experience or perception, while he or she might use a play to present social interactions in dialogue or a novel to show us how an imagined person grows up or people fall in love. We’ll consider how writers adhere to or depart from the conventions or rules for the various genres, and we’ll work at mastering the concepts and terms that literary analysis entails. We will try to evaluate the choices writers make in what they include in their imagined worlds and how they represent those worlds, from their language, “ordinary” and figurative, to their characters, plots, themes, and ideas. Our format will be discussion, and there will be four formal interpretive papers mainly of medium length (4-5 pp.) as well as frequent informal reading response papers. Students will have small research assignments to develop skill in incorporating other critical perspectives and to aim for complexity and detail in analysis. Second-level writing.

ENG-L 207 — Women and Literature (3 cr.)
27610 MW 1 :00-2 :15 P Lee Kahan
(combined with WOST-L 207/27668)
Topic: Gothic Feminism(s)
Literature at the turn of the nineteenth century was dominated by two images: the well-lit, cozy parlor of the home and the dark, cavernous interior of the gothic castle. At the center of both was the figure of the woman—benevolently presiding over the moral purity of the first and running for her life from a mysterious evil in the second. What did these figures of woman have to do with one another, and why did people who believed in the idea of home as a safe-haven invest themselves so heavily in fictions about homes falling apart under the pressure of mysterious forces? These are the kinds of questions that we will take up in this course as we examine the rise of the gothic novel in the context of emerging notions of the domestic sphere. Novels may include Horace Walpole, Castle of Otranto; Eliza Parsons, The Castle of Wolfenbach; Matthew Lewis, The Monk; Anne Radcliffe, The Italian; and Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey. In addition, we will read contributions to the 1790s debates about woman’s proper place in society by Mary Wollstonecraft, Hannah More, Catherine Macauley, and others. Assignments will include two short papers and a short research project, in addition to weekly responses to the assigned readings.

ENG-L 220 — Introduction to Shakespeare (3 cr.) CANCELED
10001 MW 5:30-6:45 P Matt Brown
  Introduces a range of Shakespearean genres, including comedies, tragedies, history plays, narrative poems, and sonnets. Attention to Shakespears’s life and historical background.

ENG-L 348 — 19th Century British Fiction (3 cr.)
27611 MW 2:30-3:45 P Karen Gindele
Topic: Comedy Tonight
In this course we'll read three substantial, mainly funny English novels—two that really are comic, by women writers, and one classified as a sensation novel but including comedy, written by a man: Austen's Emma, Margaret Oliphant's Miss Marjoribanks, and Wilkie Collins's The Woman in White. We'll also read comedy theory, both basic and complex. We'll examine thematic and formal elements of the genre and some of its overlap with stage comedy. The format of the class will be discussion. Students will write three formal papers, do some independent research to include in these papers, and write frequent short informal response papers as well.

ENG-L 350 — Early American Writing & Culture to 1800 (3 cr.) Jake Mattox
27612 MW 1:00-2:15 P
This course offers an introduction to the writings and key contextual issues of the pre-colonial, colonial, and revolutionary eras in North America. We will read broadly to gain an understanding of the multiplicity of voices and texts coming into contact with one another, from Native American oral culture to the writings of the Spanish, French, Puritans, and Africans in the Americas. We will also examine a variety of genres central to the development of an “American” literature, such as the captivity narrative (the salacious best-sellers of the day featuring violence, kidnapping, and sexual desire), the conversion narrative, the sermon, and early poetry. These texts covered a rich variety of topics and concerns, including the relationship of “settler” to “native,” the construction of ideas of innate difference between the two, contests over cultural authority, the development of concepts of the natural world, and the exploration of enlightenment ideals of human rationality, rights, and democratic government.

ENG-L 379 — American Ethnic & Minority Literature (3 cr.) Benjamin Balthaser
27613 MW 4:00-5:15 P

ENG-L 381 — Recent Writing (3 cr.) Kelcey Parker
27614 TR 11:30-12:45 P
Topic: Contemporary Short Stories Around the World
This course will examine the contemporary short story in its various manifestations around the globe. We will read story collections by individual authors from countries like India, Japan, Russia, and New Zealand, as well as larger samplings of contemporary stories in anthologies of African, Latin American, South Asian, Israeli, and U.S. writers. Our readings will be supplemented contextual theories of narrative and cognition (that is to say, how we understand what a story is, and how our brain processes stories). We will put questions of place—how a nation’s social and political climate “shapes” a story—at the forefront of our theoretical discussions of a short story’s form and content.

ENG-L 388 — Studies in Irish Literature & Culture (3 cr.) Chu He
27615 MW 10:00-11:15 A

ENG-L 390 — Children’s Literature (3 cr.)
8590 MW 5 :30-6 :45 P Smiljka Cubelic
Historical and modern children’s books and selections from books; designed to assist future teachers, parents, librarians, or others in selecting the best in children’s literature.

ENG-L 390 — Children’s Literature (3 cr.) CANCELED
8591 T 1:00-3:30 P ELKHART Mary Anna Dimitrakopoulos
Historical and modern children’s books and selections from books; designed to assist future teachers, parents, librarians, or others in selecting the best in children’s literature.

ENG-L 390 — Children’s Literature (3 cr.)
8592 T 7:00-9:30 P Tracey Thomas
Historical and modern children’s books and selections from books; designed to assist future teachers, parents, librarians, or others in selecting the best in children’s literature.

Campuswide Gen Ed Common Core

ENG-T 190 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
27617 MW 2 :30-3 :45 P Kyoko Takanashi
Topic: Literary Hauntings

ENG-T 190 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
27618 TR 10 :00-11:15 A Honors-PERM Jake Mattox
Topic: Beyond Cowboys and Indians: Myths of the U.S. West
The story of the U.S. West has been told in countless ways: as conflict between advancing civilization and disappearing “savage,” as site of individual self-discovery or transformation, as a locus of unfolding national or universal progress, or more recently, as site of struggle over issues such as immigration, race, and gender. In this course we will ask how the West has been portrayed at different times and what functions such portrayals might serve. In examining these questions, we will read literary and historical accounts and view selected films and ask how and why the West has proven so important to understandings of U.S. history and culture.

ENG-T 190 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
10141 TR 1 :00-2 :15 P Kyoko Takanashi
Topic: Literary Hauntings

ENG-T 190 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
9394 TR 2 :30-3 :45 P Shawn Nichols-Boyle
Topic: Everybody’s Irish: Uncovering Plastic Paddys and “Real” Irishmen
Whatever happened to the Ireland of thatch cottages, fairies, giants, wakes, and dances? “Modern” Irishmen and women have been asking this question as far back as the nineteenth century when the Irish countryside was being transformed by the introduction of the English language and culture, and most importantly, the setting down of stories told around the fireside into print. This course will explore how some of the first Irish authors in English were able to capture the tall tales and voices of the last of the traditional Irish storytellers in writing. Most of our current views of the Irish come from these early stories, but how accurate is the stereotype of the poor, drunk, short-tempered, yet lovable Paddy? We will read literature and historical accounts, as well as watch selections from films such as The Quiet Man and Darby O’Gill and the Little People, to discover the complex image of the Irishman in print and how it has been manipulated and reproduced over time to create the “real” Irish.

ENG-T 190 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
9533 TR 2 :30-3 :45 P Benjamin Balthaser
Topic: What is Progress

ENG-T 190 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
9623 T 2 :30-3 :45 P ELKHART Jackie Collins
Topic: Stories of the Dysfunctional Family
The course focuses on the repetitive pattern of dysfunction in family groups from the ancient Greeks to modern writers. The class will analyze the causes of socially dysfunctional actions and the effects on family members and the surrounding society. We’ll study dysfunctional characters in literary works and film with the help of some psychological texts. We will examine the difficulty of breaking out of dysfunction and investigate ethical consequences of characters’ actions. How are the destructive consequences of dysfunctional acts treated by the authors in this course? How does modern society view such acts? Can dysfunctional acts be explained away by fate or birth? Where does responsibility reside?

ENG-T 191 — World Literary & Intellectual Traditions I (3 cr.)
9739 TR 4 :00-5 :15 P Bobby Meyer-Lee
Priority given to Education students
Topic: Heroes in Ancient and Medieval World Literature
Three boys without a father: one finds a sword in a stone, one is given a light saber, and one is chosen by a wand. All become heroes. The significance of these and many other similarities among such tales of heroes—as well as of their important differences—is the topic of this course. The focus, in particular, will be on heroic legends from the ancient and medieval eras, ranging across time and space from 4000 years ago in Mesopotamia (Gilgamesh), to 2500 years ago in India (the life of the Buddha), to 500 years ago in England (Sir Thomas Malory’s account of King Arthur). Throughout, we will reflect on apparent continuities among these stories as well as the vast differences in culture that they carry, and we will think about the cultural functions of heroic legends in general. And, yes, we will also talk about how the Star Wars and Harry Potter sagas fit into the long tradition of heroic literature.

ENG-T 192 — World Literary & Intellectual Traditions II (3 cr.)
9738 TR 4 :00-5 :15 P Matt Brown
Priority given to Education students
Topic: The Quest Myth in World Literature after 1700

ENG-T 390 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
10010 TR 10 :00-11 :15 A Kate Wolford
Topic: The Trouble with Beauty in Fairy Tales
Can our unrealistic ideas about beauty be laid at the dainty feet of fairy tales? In fairy tales "beauty" is often equated with good character and "ugliness" with evil. And influential social roles in fairy tales are hardly confined to pretty princesses. Witches, Princes Charming, and Trickster heroes are also stock characters in fairy tales and have their own complicated impact on culture. This course will explore the ethical implications of the content, art, and history of fairy tales from several cultures and traditions. By exploring tales such as “The Little Mermaid” through the primary text by Hans Christian Andersen, illustrations by 19th-century artists like Edmund Dulac, and the powerfully popular Disney movie of the late 20th century, we’ll delve into the impact such tales have on society. Are they worth telling? Are they good for children? What ethical responsibilities do illustrators, fairy tale authors, and interpreters have in transmitting fairy tales? Using approaches from the disciplines of art history, literary criticism, and social history, we’ll try to find the answers. This course will focus on improving student writing and research skills. Three papers, an annotated bibliography and regular online entries on a class-focused blog will be required.

ENG-T 390 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
10152 MW 1 :00-2 :15 P Chu He
Topic: Bad Mothers
In literature, mothers are often portrayed as loving, selfless, sacrificial angels in the house. What about those bad mothers? Those who do not take care of their children, those who leave their home, those who have troubled relationship with their family members? Are they wicked, victimized, or rebelling? How could we view mothers as people rather than as symbol, type, or category? By reading historical and cultural writings as well as literature from a variety of racial and ethnic background, we will examine the gender norms for “good mothers” in specific historical and cultural context and explore sociopolitical, ideological, and cultural reasons for “bad mothers.” Therefore, this course will explore how mothers are inscribed in various discourses, how they represent or challenge traditional values and morals, how they reconcile their sexuality, freedom, and individuality with their familial obligations, and how the “good/bad mothers” could be redefined.

ENG-T 390 — Literary & Intellectual Traditions (3 cr.)
10009 TR 4 :00-5 :15 P Joe Chaney
Topic: Crimes of Fiction
This course examines a range of techniques and abuses that fall into the general category of literary, artistic, and intellectual “borrowing.” We’ll identify and study examples along the continuum from quotation, collage, allusion, translation, imitation, parody, and the milder forms of unacknowledged influence, to instances of copying, theft, and fraud, including authorship hoaxes, plagiarism and other forms of what now counts as copyright infringement. The theme is, in some sense, the problematic nature of originality. Is true originality possible? When and to what extent are influence and borrowing justified, good, and even unavoidable? What authorizes these acts? A series of visiting authors and artists highlight such questions in the course. These visitors will serve as “witnesses” to some of the practices with which we’ll be concerned throughout the course.

ENG-W 031 — Pre-Composition (3 cr.) S/F graded
This course prepares students for college writing at the W130 level by focusing on fundamental writing skills in an academic context; in particular, summary, analysis, and synthesis. We will study writing as an interpretive act, organization as the logical progression of ideas, and grammar as the effective conveyance of meaning. Students will learn revision as the thoughtful development of ideas and editing as the direct and accurate presentation of those ideas.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.
 

ENG-W 130 — Principles of Composition (3 cr.)
In this course, students should become more confident as interpreters of college-level reading and will become well-prepared for W131. Students will also gain a wider range of tools for interpreting academic texts and for developing their ideas in relation to those texts. We will focus on using summary, analysis, and synthesis to produce thoughtful, organized, theory-driven essays, and will continue to work on organizational strategies and effective language use within that context.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.

ENG-W 131 — Elementary Composition (3 cr.)
In this course, students will expand their range of strategies for interpreting academic texts, for developing their ideas in relation to those texts, and for expressing those ideas in thoughtful, organized, theory-driven essays, while continuing to work on the effective organization and presentation of those ideas. W131 addresses these goals at a more challenging level than W130 and includes an introduction to college-level research writing.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.

ENG-W 203 — Creative Writing (3 cr.)
8664 MW 10:00-11:15 A Kelcey Parker
This course will explore the intersections of art and literature, paint and words. We will study painters who try writing (Rothko called it "this wrestling with the typewriter"), writers who would rather paint (Virginia Woolf thought painting a higher art form than writing), writing that paints with words, and painting that communicates with and without text. We'll cover a broad sweep of time and various artists -- from seventeenth century painter Johannes Vermeer to contemporary poet Mark Doty -- to study the evolving interaction and conflict between painting and writing. We'll also experiment with our own creations in art and language, seeing what connections and tensions we find.

ENG-W 203 — Creative Writing (3 cr.)
8663 TR 1:00-2:15 P Clayton Michaels
Exploratory course in writing in which students may attempt effective expression in poetry and fiction.

ENG-W 231 — Professional Writing Skills (3 cr.)
This course challenges students to explore the distinctive uses of reading and writing as critical thinking and problem-solving methods for a variety of professional fields. Even though this type of writing shares some of the basic skills of organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, and accurate word choices with previous writing classes, it focuses on the process of producing logical and compelling arguments for different professional contexts. Students will work with two portfolios, paragraph development, sentence structure, and accurate word choices with previous writing classes, it focuses on the process of producing logical and compelling arguments for different business contexts. Students will work with two portfolios, one individual and one collaborative, based on two checklists of specific requirements.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.

ENG-W 232 — Intro to Business Writing ( 3 cr.)
This course challenges students to explore the distinctive uses of reading and writing as critical thinking and problem-solving methods for business organizations. Even though this type of writing shares some of the basic skills of organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, and accurate word choices with previous writing classes, it focuses on the process of producing logical and compelling arguments for different business contexts. Students will work with two portfolios, one individual and one collaborative, based on two checklists of specific requirements.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.

ENG-W 250 — Writing in Context (3 cr.)
8669 TR 1:00-2:15 P Rebecca Brittenham
Topic: Food Culture
This course explores the production, preparation, and consumption of food to inspire student writing on every aspect of this multifaceted topic. The rich literature on food demonstrates its power to provoke people’s passionate attachments and visceral aversions, to evoke memories, shape human interactions, and impact the structure and welfare of entire societies. Beginning from the famous dictum, “Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are,” we will examine the ways in which food speaks to every aspect of our culture, including the jobs people do or refuse to do, family heritages, and individual goals and values. Students will build from a range of literary and non-literary sources, including the New York Times and reality TV, to write source-based, thesis-driven academic papers along with more experimental pieces such as restaurant reviews, food blogs, and family recipes.

ENG-W 260 — Film Criticism (3 cr.)
27619 TR 4:00-5:15 P Elaine Roth
This class surveys a wide range of film criticism, including formalist film theory, the auteur theory, feminist film theory, and genre studies. For several assignments, students will write in the manner of a particular school of film criticism. We will apply these theories to various films, including several directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Films may include Vertigo, Strangers on a Train, and Rear Window.

ENG-W 270 — Argumentative Writing (3 cr.)
This course challenges students to explore the distinctive uses of reading and writing as critical thinking and problem-solving methods for business organizations. Even though this type of writing shares some of the basic skills of organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, and accurate word choices with previous writing classes, it focuses on the process of producing logical and compelling arguments for different business contexts. Students will work with two portfolios, one individual and one collaborative, based on two checklists of specific requirements.
See Schedule of Classes on OneStart (onestart.iu.edu) for days and times.

ENG-W 303 — Writing Poetry (3 cr.)
10154 W 7:00-9:30 P David Dodd Lee
This class will be a survey course of contemporary poetry, as well as a workshop. We will examine various narrative structures in an attempt to define the evolution of free verse and how various writers use language in order to subvert solipsism and/or as a sort of bludgeon against cultural sentimentality. We will also look at how various writers transcend the self by moving beyond simple reflections of reality without resorting to fixed forms or received ideas. Further, we will investigate through texts and your own writing how to allow the subconscious to flood the page and how to match your ideas and emotions to an appropriate narrative (or non-narrative) form. Students will write and revise poems of their own (app. 9 for undergrads, 11 for grad students) in an effort to create a thread of coherence that runs through not only single pieces but a small body of work. Students will also keep a reader response journal, write experimental poems based on in-class exercises, and write one (grad students two) informal two page paper on one of our assigned poets (there will be several texts).

ENG-W 315 — Writing For the Web (3 cr.)
9270  TR 6:00-7:15 P Shawn Nichols-Boyle
Introduces students to new forms of writing (beyond word processing and desktop publishing) made possible by computers-hypertext, electronic mail, and computer conferencing - and explores what impact these new forms have on literacy skills for writers and readers of such computer-delivered texts.

ENG-W 350 — Advanced Expository Writing (3 cr.)
8670  TR 2:30-3:45 P Rebecca Gerdes
Intended for students who enjoy writing essays, the course focuses on developing style and voice through a range of increasingly sophisticated assignments. A significant goal of the course is for students to learn to write with facility, grace, and effectiveness, and as editors and readers to recognize those qualities in the writing of others.

ENG-W 403 — Advanced Writing Poetry (3 cr.)
31267 M 5:30-8:00 P David Dodd Lee
(combined with ENG-W 513/27620)
This class will be a survey course of contemporary poetry, as well as a workshop. We will examine various narrative structures in an attempt to define the evolution of free verse and how various writers use language in order to subvert solipsism and/or as a sort of bludgeon against cultural sentimentality. We will also look at how various writers transcend the self by moving beyond simple reflections of reality without resorting to fixed forms or received ideas. Further, we will investigate through texts and your own writing how to allow the subconscious to flood the page and how to match your ideas and emotions to an appropriate narrative (or non-narrative) form. Students will write and revise poems of their own (app. 9 for undergrads, 11 for grad students) in an effort to create a thread of coherence that runs through not only single pieces but a small body of work. Students will also keep a reader response journal, write experimental poems based on in-class exercises, and write one (grad students two) informal two page paper on one of our assigned poets (there will be several texts).

Comparative Literature

CMLT-C 190 — Introduction to Film (3 cr.)
9622 MW 10:00-11:15 A Andrew DeSelm
10197 MW 1:00-2:15 P
This class examines the basic nature of film language through a close analysis of particular films. We will cover film form, film history, film theory, and film genres. This course aims to introduce students to fundamental concepts in film studies and prepare them for more focused courses in film history, aesthetics, and theory.

 CMLT-C 293 — History of Motion Pictures I (3 cr.)
27462 TR 10:00-11:15 A Elaine Roth
  This course studies the evolution of cinema as an institution and art form, moving from the origins of cinema in the late nineteenth century through World War II. We will cover film movements from the time period, such as French New Wave and Italian Neorealism. Screenings may include films by Charlie Chaplin (The Gold Rush), Buster Keaton (Sherlock Jr.), Francois Truffaut (The 400 Blows), Jean-Luc Goddard (Breathless), and Vittorio De Sica (The Bicycle Thieves).