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GENERAL EDUCATION: COMMON CORE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 Fall 2013 (Updated April 29, 2013)

Additional course descriptions will be posted as they become available.

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.

CLICK THE COURSE NUMBER TO ACCESS THE CLASS MEETING TIMES

 

 

ART, AESTHETICS, AND CREATIVITY

 

ENG-A 190 ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY

EXPLORING STORIES AND POEMS THROUGH IMITATION (ALSO “IMITATING STORIES AND POEMS)

One of the first practices artists learn in imitation, or the creation of an artistic work “after” that of an established artist.  Imitations are then labeled according to the work they take after: “After Picasso”.  In this class students will try different approaches to creative writing, using a variety of imitation exercises to create poems, prose poems, flash fiction, essays, and graphic narratives.  We’ll read work in a variety of forms and styles to guide us in shaping our own content and subject matter. 

 

MY DAILY LIFE EXTRAORDINAIRE!

Description: This course explores artistic interventions within the fabric of everyday life. We will first start by rediscovering and reclaiming objects of our daily lives to give them a renewed sense of purpose and meaning. Literary texts, the study of graphic design, and art works will help spark our artistic launch. The second half of the semester is dedicated to the study and production of slide shows. Originally, slide shows – the old-fashioned kind using a carousel – were both a high-tech form of family entertainment and an artistic medium used by experimental artists from the 1960s onward. You may be asked to produce your own slide show using Power Point and to screen it for public viewing at IUSB.  (F08, S09 Magnan-Park)

 

POETRY AND AUTOBIOGRAPHY: THE AUTHENTICITY OF SELF IN THE LYRIC POEM

Students will examine their own lives through the prism of “autobiographical” poetry texts (as well as other art forms, including movies, the visual arts, music, etc.). We will examine the idea of poetic "persona" in contemporary poetry by reading various authors, as well as exploring film and visual art, and you will learn through various writing projects, and possibly a visual art project or two, how to determine, in your own autobiographical poems, what you need to do to get the most "truth" out of language through means of concision, music in language, exaggeration, and by eliminating cliché. The influence of class, gender, and race will all be germane to a deep understanding of how we authentically express and/or build into a complex language construct a representation of the self. You will write imitation poems as well as poems wholly your own. Additionally you will keep a journal of reader responses to the various readings and films, and write two short analytical response papers.

 

FINA-A 190  ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY 

EXPLORING THE CITY

Focuses on the forces which are shaping cities today.  Students will make use of local resources, local records and historical collections in their research projects.  They will make measured drawings, elevations and site plans of their research topics.   Topics such as local history, industrialization, main street America, racial and ethnic segregation, organic and engineered growth, and environmental issues are considered, especially as they affected the South Bend- Mishawka area and Chicago.

 

HISTORY & PRACTICE OF PRINTMAKING

This course combines a survey of the social critiques of printmakers from 15th to 21st century, technical innovations and a studio practicum of printmaking processes.  The overview is intended to assist students in their appreciation and understanding of visual culture and political contexts as well as the technological changes of the media.  The “studio practice” provides “hands-on” demonstrations and engagement to investigate the technical and expressive processes of printmaking (including papermaking, relief printing, etching and multi-media design).


VISUAL CULTURE – TECHNOLOGY & MEDIA

     Study of visual culture including photography, advertising, avatars,and video.


POINT AND SHOOT: AN INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

This introductory level course will explore digital technology for capturing, enhancing, and producing still lens-based images. The course will address the visual language of camera-generated images, computer output techniques, the connoisseurship of digital image output as well as basic digital camera operations. The course assumes no prior knowledge or experience with digital imaging technologies or materials. Students must provide a digital camera. TEXT:  Stone& London, A short Course in Digital Photography Prentice Hall, 2009. 


 

FINA-A 399  ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY  

 

ARTIST AND NEW MEDIA

(P: One of the following: Tel-T 283, Fina-P 273, Jour-J 210, Info-I 101, Fina-S 291, or Mus-T 120)

This course is primarily intended for students who wish to pursue new media as a means of artistic expression.  The course considers new media from both an historical/cultural/critical base (readings, lectures, viewing), and from an experiential base (production/exhibition projects in selected new media genres).  At the end of the course, the successful student should have acquired a foundational vocabulary in the history and criticism of new media, an understanding of how artists have used and are using new media as a means of artistic expression, and a basic technical fluency with new media production tools.

 

MUS-A 190  ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY

 

EXPLORING MUSICAL COMPOSITION                   

This course will introduce students to the materials of music – pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony – and to the notational tools used by musicians to represent these materials. Throughout the semester each student will use the tools and skills learned to compose simple musical pieces. No previous music education is required.

 (Some sections offered for music majors only, permission required)


 

THTR-A 190  ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY  

INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE  

This introductory course examines the theatre, plays and playwriting, the actor, designers and technicians, the director, traditions of the theatre, the modern theatre, musical theatre, the future of theatre, and the critic. This is a participatory class.   

 

 

HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS


ANTH-B 399 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

EDUCATION AND SOCIETY - Approval pending


BUS-B 190 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Business organizations play an important role in our lives. We interact with businesses in a variety of ways, including as employees, consumers, and investors. One form of business organization—corporations—wield enormous power. Given the pervasiveness of business in our lives, one intention of this class is to help you make greater sense of the world in which you live and enable you to make better informed decisions.  In particular, W100 introduces you to a wide range of management issues. This will help to prepare you for other business classes that you may take and for your career. Or, for nonbusiness students, it will give you a useful overview of key business issues and the context within which businesses operate. Also this class may help you choose your career by making you aware of key features of: business trends, business ownership, business management, management of human resources, marketing, and managing financial resources.

 

BUS-B 399  HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BUSINESS & SOCIETY

This course examines business in terms of its stakeholders throughout society. By the end of this course, you should know the major stakeholders of a business and key concepts of business ethics. You should be able to think critically about issues of business and society, appreciate and be able to synthesize opposing points of view, and work successfully in a team.

 

POLS-B 190  HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

 

ABUSE OF NUMBERS IN POLITICS  (formerly Introduction to Politics and Counting/Questioning Democracy)

Mark Twain is often credited with having claimed "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics." This course will examine how social scientists, politicians, advocacy groups and political commentators use statistics to support arguments; the course does not presume that all statistics are lies, but will work to develop the critical tools to evaluate when statistics are well researched and fairly presented--and when not.  This is not a course in statistics and does not require special math skills, but will examine how numbers are used in the social sciences and politics.

 

POLS-B 399  HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS                                                                       (P: ENG-W 131) 

URBAN POLITICS AND POLICY

This course considers the politics of cities, suburbs, and regions in the United States from numerous perspectives. Cities are at the heart of American democracy; they are the units of government closest to the people, making citizens more likely to interact with their local governments than the national or a state government on a daily basis. However, cities also serve as hubs of commerce, and many argue their governments cater decisions to the interests of the private sector. Finding ways to serve residents while crafting development plans to suit businesses is one of the central challenges of governing cities. Because of cities’ dynamic and ever-changing nature, we will take a historical approach to urban politics while considering a wide range of theories of city development. Discussions of political power will be at the center of units considering the initial development of U.S. cities, political institutions, federalism, race, metropolitan expansion, globalization, and residential displacement. Though this is a course on politics, understanding the structure of power in cities requires inquiries going beyond the basic institutions of local government. Readings and discussions also borrow from sociology, urban planning, economics, geography, and a range of other disciplines.

 

PSY-B 190  HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

DEATH AND LIFE LESSONS                

This course focuses on death and end-of-life issues within a variety of perspectives, including historical, biomedical, multicultural, and religious theories. Existential issues related to the human significance of death for individuals and community will be addressed. Students will be introduced to a basic overview of laws and ethics regarding end-of-life issues, and participate in group discussions using critical thinking skills acquired in class. Guest speakers will include professionals working in funeral preparation, hospice, and grief and bereavement programs.

 

PSYCHOLOGY OF PARENTING

In this course on parenting, we will learn about basic parenting processes using academic texts as well as self-help parenting manuals.  We will explore theories and research on parenting from an interdisciplinary perspective as well as considering how this information should inform public policy.  Last, we will focus on parenting images in the world at large by using films, popular comics, and other everyday media to better understand parenting theory and how society views parenting.  You do NOT need to be a parent to take this course!

 

PSY-B 399  HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS                                                 (P: PSY-P 103, ENG-W 131)


 

SPIRTUALITY & SOCIAL JUSTICE  (formerly SPIRIT MEETS SOCIAL JUSTICE: THE WORLD’S RELIGIONS & SOCIAL ACTIVISM)

 

This class will explore how spirituality intersects with social justice issues, asking what role psychological theory, research, and practice have played. Primarily the course will examine the social institutions related to religion and politics. In particular, we will examine the infrastructures of six widely known belief traditions (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Sikhism). Because these traditions exist within a canvas of beliefs less widely known, we will also examine Indigenous traditions (selecting a small subset from each continent), Wicca, and Atheism/Agnosticism. We will ask how each of these traditions’ principles inform a person or group’s involvement in social justice activities. Specifically, definitions of “social justice,” requirements of personal spiritual development, rewards of social justice work,  authenticity and identity, interaction between humanity and the divine, and consequences of inaction.

     

SUICIDE & DEPRESSION

Suicide accounts for over 31,000 deaths in the United States each year. This course details wide-ranging information about suicide, from basic demographic factors, definitions, and theories from multiple disciplines, to cutting-edge topics such as physician-assisted and rational suicide. The course is predominantly a lecture-discussion format in which current knowledge about suicide is presented from across the multidisciplinary field of suicidology (i.e., the scientific study of suicide and suicidal behavior). Because it has a prominent place with respect to suicide, depression also will be presented as a topic. Other topics to be covered in the class include: facts and myths of suicide; historical aspects of suicide; definitions; depression; theories of suicide; the demography and epidemiology of suicide; sex/gender issues/differences in suicide; suicide across the life-span: children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly; suicide clues and communication; postvention; family and other survivors of suicide; and ethical/philosophical/religious/legal issues inherent in suicidology.

 

SOC-B 190  HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

YOUTH IN TODAY'S SOCIETY

This is a course about youth in the contemporary United States. We will spend time examining the lives of older youth (middle schoolers, teenagers, and young adults) rather than younger children, although the questions we raise throughout the semester can apply to children of all ages.  Our approach to studying youth focuses on historical and cultural interpretations of youth cultures in the United States, as well as the social institutions that inform individual and group experiences of youth.

 

SOC-B 399 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS                                     (P: ENG-W 131)

ANIMALS AND SOCIETY

This course will explore peoples’ relationships with animals and the various roles that animals play in human societies. We will consider people’s interactions with a wide range of species, but our primary focus will be on the role of domestic animals in human lives and societies. A significant portion of the course addresses people’s relationships with pets, and treatment and interactions with animals used for food. Additional topics will include differences and similarities between human and nonhuman animals, historical and cultural variations in human-animal relations, debates over animal rights and treatment, and the impact of human-animal relations on the welfare of animals, humans, and society. This is an interdisciplinary course that will include perspectives from a range of fields, including sociology, psychology, history, anthropology, and zoology. The course is taught as a seminar, so students will be expected to take an active role, reading, discussing, and writing about course topics.



SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES

What are the elements of balanced, equitable development? Why are these so hard to achieve? Seeking answers to these questions will form the core of this seminar. We will look at what they mean for the various social problems facing the planet.
Finally, we will look at efforts to forge alternative paths to development and quality of life. While we're not likely to find a fix to any of the problems, we will also probe possible interventions to make a positive difference while seeking to build a more
 equitable, peaceful, and sustainable world.

 

SPCH-S 322 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS (NUMBER SHOULD CHANGE TO B399)

DECEPTION AND LYING

Traditionally, communication courses explore the hows and whys of human communication. The field of interpersonal communication tends to focus on theories, skills and abilities that would help students improve their working relationships, from romantic relationships to co-workers. But there's more to communication than just the "good side." What about lies? Deception? Manipulation? These are key areas of study that need to be understood, much the same as we discuss effective and productive communication characteristics.

With this said, we will be studying the "dark side" of communication. We will depart from the norm and focus on the art of deception, lying, deception, truthtelling and acceptable forms of deception (poker anyone?). Likewise, we will cover hoaxers and con artists: those "professional liars" in our communities. In doing this, my goal is to better prepare students to become critical receivers of messages: both the "good" and the "bad" (however we end up defining these monikers).

 

WGS-B399 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS (was WOST B399)

 

RACE & REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS

This course examines how race and class have shaped women’s access to birth control, their ability to make reproductive choices and to have control over their own bodies. We will discuss a number of themes – both current and historical. This course will start with a look at childbearing and –raising in slave communities and on Native American reservations. We will then continue with a discussion of a variety of case studies that exemplify how the U.S. government has limited the reproductive rights and choices of certain communities over the last century. Topics include forced sterilization, the eugenics movements, the mistreatment of single mothers in the early 20th century, and medical experiments on communities of color.  In the second half of the semester, we will turn our attention to current controversies, incl. teenagers’ access to sex education and birth control, the debate about emergency contraception and abortion, gay and lesbian parents, as well as new reproductive technologies and their ethical implications. We will also discuss how women have acted, individually and collectively, to fight oppression and create community.

 

THE NATURAL WORLD

 

ANTH-N 190  THE NATURAL WORLD

BECOMING HUMAN

An introduction to the evolutionary development of humans, viewed in both a biological and cultural context. Major topics include the concept of evolution, biological relationships between humans and other primates, the fossil record of hominid evolution, and the basic methods employed by archaeologists in the study of human biological and social development.

 

AST-N190    THE NATURAL WORLD

 

LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE

The purpose of this class is to expose you to a relatively new area of science, Astrobiology.  This discipline encompasses a variety of areas, all of which we will touch upon during the course.  These include chemistry, physics, biology, geology and of course astronomy.  You do not need to be an expert in these, you will learn the essentials in order to appreciate how all of these disciplines come together and work together in our search to understand what life is and how we may go about trying to find it outside the earth, the only example we have of Life in the Universe.

 

STARS AND GALAXIES

Our universe is a vast place that contains a variety of objects that almost defy the imagination. This course is a journey that starts from our extended local neighborhood of nearby stars, continues to explore our galaxy and its inhabitants, and ends at the far reaches of known space. Along the way we will discover strange objects such as pulsars, black holes, and exploding galaxies, and we will face some of the remaining deep mysteries about the structure of the universe that occupy today's cosmologists.

 

WORLDS OUTSIDE OUR OWN                  

In this course we will look at planetary bodies, including Earth. Although we will note systematic similarities, we will focus on the unusual features that make them "worlds" in their own right. Major topics will include the following: historical background and observing the night sky; a quantitative description of planetary motion; light and radiation; and planetary bodies (planets, their moons, asteroids and comets). We will also discuss social and political issues, such as the priority we should place on exploring the Solar System considering competing demands for our limited resources.

 

BIOL-N 190  THE NATURAL WORLD

A river runs through it: The biology and politics of rivers and streams

(same as Introduction to Aquatic Ecology)

This course will introduce students to the natural and artificial forces that influence the ecology of our rivers and streams.  Through lectures, lab activities, and field trips, the course will explore how we humans impact our local rivers and streams, as well as the animals and plants that rely on these aquatic resources.  Topics to be discussed will include: food webs, exotic and introduced species, abiotic vs. biotic factors, energy transfer, and the ecology and biology of the flora and fauna of local rivers and streams.

 

HUMAN GENETICS

This course is designed to investigate human genetics and includes a historical approach in order to understand how the science has evolved. Controversy surrounds some recent innovations within this science. We’ll consider what technical and ethical challenges we can anticipate in the future. A laboratory component of the course is included within this three-credit course to demonstrate the techniques scientists use to ask questions of nature.

  

MICROBES AND YOU   (Also titled Germs: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly) 

 

Introduces students to the fascinating microbial world.  Students will discover that microorganisms are found everywhere and will gain an appreciation of the natural relationships of microorganisms with their habitat. Students will conduct a scientific study, in the course of which they’ll learn lab techniques for determining the identity of an unknown organism and for handling microorganisms safely and effectively.

 

CHEM-N 190  THE NATURAL WORLD

CHEMISTRY AND OUR ENVIRONMENT

The course focuses on topical, interdisciplinary issues such as the environment, energy, and nutrition.  The science is introduced on a need-to-know basis as issues are discussed and developed.  There are no pre-requisites for this course. Instruction will focus on only those aspects of the fundamentals of chemistry that have a direct bearing on the applications of chemistry to society.

 

CHEM-N 390  THE NATURAL WORLD                    (P: One Semester of any college level science) 

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY OF WATER AND WASTE

This course covers the second half (chapters 10-16) of Environmental Chemistry, 4th edition, by Colin Baird and Michael Cann, W.H. Freeman and Company, New York, 2008.  It may be followed or preceded by CHEM-N 390 The Natural World:  Environmental Chemistry of Air and Energy.  This course focuses on solubility, redox, and acid-base reactions occurring in natural and polluted water, but also considers the treatment of solid waste in addition to wastewater.  The environmental impact of heavy metals (such as mercury and lead) and toxic organic compounds (such as insecticides and herbicides) are also discussed.  Although new chemical concepts are introduced, and old concepts are expanded upon, this course primarily applies previously-learned chemistry (from CHEM-C 105 and C106) to environmental issues.

 

GEOL-N 190  THE NATURAL WORLD                                                                                       (MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 3)

GEOLOGY OF THE NATIONAL PARKS

Our national and state parks contain some of the most beautiful scenery found on the planet, and accordingly draw visitors from around the world. Their spectacular landscapes are the result of a wide range of geologic processes that we will discuss in this course. After introducing the basic framework of plate tectonics we will use individual parks as geologic case studies and introduce geological principles as necessary to scientifically understand what gives the parks their unique character. We will also discuss the political and historical framework in which the park system exists: the establishment and management of national and state parks is a massive undertaking including extensive political, philosophical and economic considerations.

 

ROCKS, GEMS AND FOSSILS

Rocks, gems, and fossils have intrigued people from the beginning.  Through basic identification of rocks and minerals, students will learn how the history of our planet has been interpreted.  Emphasis on the uses of these materials will show students how many natural resources we extract from our planet and how this process has affected the development of countries and civilizations around the world. By learning about the identification, classification, and formation of fossils, students will learn about our past here in Indiana, North America, and planet Earth.


EARTH AND SPACE                                                                               (P: Math 014 or MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 3)

This course will teach the basic concepts of Physical Geology, with an emphasis on rocks, minerals, earthquakes, volcanoes, and Plate Tectonics. The Historical Geology portion looks at interpreting Earth's history with Relative Dating, and the identification of many fossils and how they form.  Also, an introduction into the basics of Astronomy and Meteorology.

 

MATH-N 390  THE NATURAL WORLD          (P: Math M215 with a C  or better or permission of instructor)

MATHEMATICS AS A HUMAN ACTIVITY

Explores an important scientific or technological issue in modern society. Applies scientific methods and interdisciplinary perspectives in an examination of the subject. Investigates the broader implications and ethical dimensions of scientific research and technological advancement. This course explores the ways in which central mathematical ideas developed cognitively, historically and across cultures. Course work includes solving problems situated in historical contexts, drawn from subjects including numeration and arithmetic, algebra and number theory, practical and axiomatic geometry, set theory and calculus.


PHYS-N 190  THE NATURAL WORLD                                                                                       (MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 3)

 ENERGY IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

We live in a unique period in the history of our planet.  In the span of a few centuries, hydrocarbon deposits with origins dating back hundreds of millions of years will be almost completely depleted.  The cheap energy offered by these deposits – petroleum, natural gas, and coal – has fueled a profound revolution in the character of human life (at least for those of us in relatively wealthy countries).  However, at the beginning of the 21st century we can begin to see the end of this era of cheap energy.  This course will examine the history and current status of energy production and consumption in the U.S. and the world, including the environmental impacts of various energy technologies, investigate the question of just how long the various fossil fuels are likely to last, and explore some of the alternatives for meeting humankind’s energy needs once the demand for petroleum and other fossil fuels outstrips the world’s capacity to produce them.

 

DISCOVERED PHYSICS   (5 CR)

The universe is full of wondrous and diverse phenomena such as exploding stars and gently falling snowflakes. Persons of great conceit think that this can all be understood in terms of a small set of rules and elementary objects. This course is designed to help the student learn how (we think) the universe works and how these ideas are generated, tested, and communicated. Models of nature and the methods of elementary quantitative problem solving are studied in the lecture and recitation portions of the course. The laboratory component of the course helps the student learn the practice of experiment and guides the student in developing, executing and reporting on experiments of their own design.

 

 

LITERARY AND INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

 

ENG-T 190  LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                                  (Reading Placement, 90 or above)   

BEYOND COWBOYS AND INDIANS:THE MYTHS OF THE U.S. WEST

The story of the U.S. West has been told in countless ways: as conflict between advancing civilization and disappearing “savage,” as site of individual self-discovery or transformation, or more recently, as site of struggle over issues such as immigration and race. In this course we will ask how the West has been portrayed at different times and what functions such portrayals might serve. In examining these questions, we will read literary and historical accounts and view selected films and ask how and why the West has proven so important to understandings of U.S. history and culture.

 

EVERYBODY’S IRISH: UNCOVERING PLASTIC PADDYS AND “REAL” IRISHMEN

Whatever happened to the Ireland of thatch cottages, fairies, giants, wakes, and dances? “Modern” Irishmen and women have been asking this question as far back as the nineteenth century when the Irish countryside was being transformed by the introduction of the English language and culture, and most importantly, the setting down of stories told around the fireside into print. This course will explore how some of the first Irish authors in English were able to capture the tall tales and voices of the last of the traditional Irish storytellers in writing. Most of our current views of the Irish come from these early stories, but how accurate is the stereotype of the poor, drunk, short-tempered, yet lovable Paddy? We will read literature and historical accounts, as well as watch selections from films such as The Quiet Man and Darby O’Gill and the Little People, to discover the complex image of the Irishman in print and how it has been manipulated and reproduced over time to create the “real” Irish.

 

LITERARY HAUNTINGS 

In this course, we will read literary works from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on the theme of “Literary Hauntings.”  For the first half of the semester, we will read various ghost stories from around the globe and discuss the cultural characteristics of different ghosts, their attachment to specific locales, and what they mean to their respective cultural communities.  For the second half of the semester, we will turn our attention to one of the most famous ghosts in the history of English literature – in William Shakespeare’s Hamlet.  We will not only discuss the significance of Hamlet’s ghost, but also look at some literary and film adaptations to explore how Shakespeare’s work “haunts” literary representations at different historical moments.

STORIES OF THE DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILY  (formerly The Dysfunctional Family in Literature)  

The course focuses on the repetitive pattern of dysfunction in family groups from the ancient Greeks to modern writers. The class will analyze the causes of socially dysfunctional actions and the effects on family members and the surrounding society. We’ll study dysfunctional characters in literary works and film with the help of some psychological texts. We will examine the difficulty of breaking out of dysfunction and investigate ethical consequences of characters’ actions. How are the destructive consequences of dysfunctional acts treated by the authors in this course? How does modern society view such acts? Can dysfunctional acts be explained away by fate or birth? Where does responsibility reside?

 

SIGNED, THE LAND OF THE LONG WHITE CLOUD

New Zealand is increasingly called by its indigenous Māori name, Aotearoa, the land of the long white cloud, referring back to Māori mythology according to which the explorer Kupe and his crew discovered the North Island thanks to the long cloud that permanently hung over it. The existence of a bilingual name for a single country betrays some of the tensions at play in the emergence and establishment of New Zealand’s national identity along a binary divide between the indigenous Maori population and the Pākehā (European) settler. This course foregrounds the rise and establishment of New Zealand’s political, cultural, and literary, independence from Great Britain through the study of the distinctive stylistic traits of signature Kiwi authors and film directors of both Māori and Pākehā descent.

 

THE SOCIAL NETWORK –

 

ENG-T 191 WORLD LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS I                                   (Reading Placement, 90 or above)   

HEROES IN ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL WORLD LITERATURE

RESTRICTION: PRIORITY FOR THIS SECTION IS GIVEN TO EDUCATION STUDENTS (unless otherwise noted in the online schedule of classes. The restriction may be removed in order to fill the class.)

Three boys without a father:  one finds a sword in a stone, one is given a light saber, and one is chosen by a wand.  All become heroes.  The significance of these and many other similarities among such tales of heroes—as well as of their important differences—is the topic of this course.  The focus, in particular, will be on heroic legends from the ancient and medieval eras, ranging across time and space from 4000 years ago in Mesopotamia (Gilgamesh), to 2500 years ago in India (the life of the Buddha), to 500 years ago in England (Sir Thomas Malory’s account of King Arthur).  Throughout, we will reflect on apparent continuities among these stories as well as the vast differences in culture that they carry, and we will think about the cultural functions of heroic legends in general.  And, yes, we will also talk about how the Star Wars and Harry Potter sagas fit into the long tradition of heroic literature.

 

ENG-T 390 LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                                                                                      (P: ENG-W131)

BAD MOTHERS

In literature, mothers are often portrayed as loving, selfless, sacrificial angels in the house.  What about those bad mothers?  Those who do not take care of their children, those who leave their home, those who have troubled relationships with their family members?  Are they wicked, victimized, or rebelling?  This course will explore how mothers are inscribed in various discourses, how they represent or challenge traditional values and morals, how they reconcile their sexuality, freedom, and individuality with their familial obligations, and how the “good/bad mothers” could be redefined.

LOVE AND WORK IN NINETEENTH CENTURY NOVELS

This course will examine the conditions and relationships of love and work in novels of nineteenth-century England, Russia, and probably France or Italy.  George Eliot’s Middlemarch and Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina will form the center of the course.  We will read some works critiquing the system of labor organized by class and gender divisions, and concurrent political theory such as Marx’s Communist Manifesto; we’ll also read materials about love and domestic life involving the increasing social possibility (and occasional fact) at least for the middle class, of being able to choose a spouse and/or profession.  This last choice applied mainly to men, of course, but we’ll look at the visible and invisible work women were allowed and required to do, especially in the domestic sphere.  There will probably be three formal analytical papers of medium length, and students will conduct independent research. The class will operate primarily by discussion. 

MUSIC AND LITERATURE

This course is designed around the different ways in which Music and Literature haveinteracted in different eras. To better express these relations, students will focus on threedifferent modules: Poetry and Music, Prose and Music, and Drama and Music. Eachmodule has been designed with the perspective on focusing on different works, all presented from a historical point of view. The poetry unit will begin by discussing an excerpt from Aristotle’s Poetics in order to establish mimesis as a common characteristic of both arts. It will proceed to a broader discussion of the powers ascribed to music by various poets and writers throughout history, focusing on particular excerpts spanning from Ovid’s Metamorphoses through Walt Whitman; finally, it will include discussion of the “musical” aspects of the written word, including meter (rhythm), alliteration, onomatopoeia, and text painting. The poetry unit will focus primarily on musical works inspired by literary creations and the ways in which composers interpret literary texts to depict literary characters or events. The primary foci will include 1001 Arabian Nights and Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherezade, Don Quixote and Strauss in Prose (program music). Finally, our drama unit will study discuss Oedipus Rex (Sophocles and Stravinsky), Shakespeare in Music (excerpts from A Midsummer Night’s Dream, TheTempest, and Romeo and Juliet) and will end with a more in-depth analysis relating to Shakespeare’s Othello to Verdi’s Otello.

 

HIST-T 190  LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                               (Reading Placement, 90 or above) 

DARWIN: REACTING TO THE PAST

After background on Charles Darwin’s idea on science and evolution as well as the nineteenth century British world in which he lived, students in this class will become actors in a debate before the British Royal Society. Students will take sides on the question: should Darwin be awarded the Copley medal for his achievements? Much of the class will focus on student presentations and class debates on the Copley medal as well as related questions around religion and science. For more information on this “Reacting to the Past” class see this website: http://www.darwingame.org/

HUMANS AND THE ENVIRONMENT

This course focuses on the history of Environmental movements in the U.S. from the nineteenth century to the present, within the context of the relationship of humans and the environment over a long sweep of time, from the first cultivation of agriculture to the present.  We explore, in an interdisciplinary way, the great humanistic traditions of inquiry regarding ideas of nature.  The strongest interdisciplinary tie is between literature and history.   Writers on nature such as Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Rachel Carson, and Barbara Kingsolver will be among the works analyzed.   Guest speakers active in local sustainability activities and organizations will be invited to discuss their work.  Field trips such as hikes at Rum Village park and walks to the St. Joseph river on the IU South Bend campus.  These field trips are followed by class discussion and journal writing.  The course finishes with each student writing a brief research paper on an environmentalist or an environmental group and making a Powerpoint presentation to the class. Writing intensive, discussion-focused. 

PHILADELPHIA: REVOLUTION TO REPUBLIC

This course will examine Philadelphia’s place in the American Revolution and the formation of the American republic.  Many historians believe Philadelphia should be considered as the primary example of a revolutionary city in early America.  Through the use of primary and secondary sources, students will examine the role of Philadelphia from 1600-1860.  These works will focus on the areas of race, religion, government and politics and maritime economy as these were major issues facing the United States as it moved from Revolution to Republic. 


HIST-T 390  LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                                                              (P: ENG-W 131)

The Birth of Europe

Approval pending 

This course will introduce students to a period of history that was, until recently, commonly referred to as the "Dark Ages."  We will use historical, literary, and archaeological evidence from a variety of early medieval cultures to shed light on what was actually a time of exciting changes, a period which saw the transformation of the Mediterranean-centered Roman world and rise of vibrant new cultures throughout Europe and the East.  Topics we will examine include the "barbarization" of the Roman world, the Carolingian Renaissance, the role of women in early medieval societies, the rise of Islam, and the political, economic, and spiritual reordering of the medieval world during the ninth and tenth centuries.  In the course of our explorations we will meet martyrs and missionaries, pagan warlords, Carolingian princesses and Viking raiders, and follow the development of early medieval culture up to the eve of the first millenium.


JAPAN THROUGH LIT. & FILM

A study of Japanese history and society through films and literary works (in translation) as primary sources.  A discussion and writing intensive course.  Themes include samurai, the townspeople of the Tokugawa period, the Meiji Restoration, the Japanese Empire and wars (including the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki), women in film, Japanese youth /students, the image of the “salary man” and “anime” of the postwar period.  A research paper and two solidly analytical papers required

  

  THE RISE and FALL OF THE THIRD REICH (same as Race, War, Genocide: The Nazis in Europe and the World, 1933-45)

In the National Socialist period, Germans unleashed a wave of violence across Europe.  Led by an explicitly scientific racism, National Socialist leaders gassed millions of Jews, annihilated the leadership of Poland, carried out a race-war against Russia, and worked millions of other Europeans to death in slave camps.  It can serve as a warning to all wealthy democratic nations of what might happen when the vast powers of modern society are oriented towards destruction.   Over the course of the semester, students will consider two central questions:  What accounts for the breakdown in German democracy?  To what extent are all Germans responsible for the crimes of the National Socialist state?

 

MUS-T 190  LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                                (Reading Placement, 90 or above) 


 

EXPLORING MUSICAL GENRES: CLASSICAL MUSIC & BEYOND          

This course explores the elements and performing media of music using live music, recorded music, and video. The role of music in society at different times in history in both Western and non-Western culture will be examined. Students will be expected to attend classical music concerts, and to develop the listening skills needed to write critically about their concert experience and other music experienced in the course.


EXPLORING MUSICAL GENRES: MUSIC IN THE BIG APPLE                                

This course, open to non-music and music majors, will use the city of New York as a focal point to trace the development of three styles of music: classical, jazz, and rock/pop.  From an interdisciplinary perspective, the course will begin with an overview of the social history of the city and how this lay the groundwork for an international cultural capital.  Composers and reformers will be the central topic, but the course will also touch on NYC architecture, history, and politics.

MUS T390   LITERARY AND INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS 

See description under Eng T390

 

PHIL-T 190 LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                                    ((Reading Placement, 90 or above) 

REACTING TO THE PAST: SOCRATES, GALILEO, DARWIN

This course gives students an in-depth understanding of several historical episodes using "reactive" role-playing games. Each of the three sections of the class centers on a revolution in human thinking. First, we will examine the birth of democracy in ancient Greece. Debates in the Athenian Assembly over the desirability of democratic rule, the extent of power, and the need for preserving traditions will be reenacted; special attention will be given to Plato's Republic and the trial of Socrates. Next, we will examine the debates over the sun-centered theory of Copernicus, which eventually replaced ancient views that regarded the earth as the center of creation. Galileo's trial for publicly advocating Copernicanism, and his condemnation by the Catholic Church, provides the main focus for this section of the course. Finally, we will examine the debates in the Royal Society of Great Britain over Darwin's The Origin of Species in the 1860s. Controversies over the relation between religion and science, faith and reason, and the nature and scope of scientific thinking that occurred then still reverberate today in our own culture.

PHILOSOPHY AND SCIENCE FICTION

This class examines various philosophical issues as they arise in science fiction novels, short stories, films, and television series.  Students will read or view works in science fiction accompanied by complementary philosophical selections (both classic and contemporary).  Topics to be discussed may include: (a) the limits of knowledge and the relationship between appearance and reality; (b) the nature of the mind, intelligence, and consciousness; (c) the logical puzzles that arise when imagining time travel; (d) personal identity; and (e) ethical issues involving technology, particularly biotechnology, along with those arising from social and political structures.

 

PSY-T 190  LITERARY AND INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS

REACTING TO THE PAST: DEMOCRACY, CONFLICT, & EQUALITY

Overview: This course aspires to submerge students in the kind of intellectual engagement which will encourage critical thinking, interdisciplinary inquiry, and civil discourse.  The course will consist of two re-acting games in which students must read a significant primary source and participate in the great debates which those writings originally stirred. 

The game The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 BC by Mark C. Carnes and Josiah Ober, occurs at the end of the Peloponnesian War immediately after the downfall of the Thirty Tyrants and continues through the trial of Socrates.  The students are assigned specific roles and factions to deal with such essential questions as the consequences of free speech, the responsibilities of citizenship, and the maintenance of cultural traditions.  Students need a thorough understanding of Plato’s Republic in order to adequately play out their roles.

The second game, Patriots, Loyalists, and Revolution in New York City, 1775-76 by William Offutt, asks students to critically examine the intellectual, political and social issues involved in New York’s participation in the American Revolution.  In addition to deciding whether to join the revolution or not, factions debate the roles of women, slaves, and laborers in colonial society, using Locke’s Second Treatise of Government and Thomas Paine’s Common  Sense as a basis for their arguments.

 

TEL-T 390   LITERARY AND INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS

MEDIA LAW, ETHICS, AND PUBLIC INTEREST

The purpose of this course is four-hold: [1] to explore the idea of freedom of speech through historical and theoretical examinations of U.S. case laws, media regulations and landmark Supreme Court decisions, [2] to explore the idea of media ethics through historical and theoretical examinations of controversial representations and media genres in the U.S. media history, and [3] to intersect these examinations of media law and ethics in order to develop the theoretical debate that defines meanings and the role of public interest in society, and [4] to explore how the contemporary media industry can best serve the welfare of the public. The course develops an understanding of free speech rights, while ethical considerations of the responsibility of the mass media industry are argued as public interest and welfare. The overall task of this course is to discuss new and/or justifiable approaches to challenge and negotiate the theoretical question that speech laws create an ethical dilemma in society when certain types of speech, such as hate speech and sexual speech, could be found disruptive to welfare of the public.


THTR-T 190 LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                             (Reading Placement, 90 or above) 

STRUCTURE & ANALYSIS OF DRAMA     

Explores, in an interdisciplinary way, one of the great humanistic traditions of inquiry regarding one of the following themes: ideas of self, ideas of truth, ideas of beauty, ideas of community, ideas of nature, ideas of conflict. Writing intensive, discussion-focused

 

WGS-T 190 LITERARY AND INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS

REACTING TO THE PAST: SEX WARS AND SOCIAL CHANGE

This course provides an overview of the history of women in the United States, but it also includes complementary material from throughout North America from pre-Revolutionary times to the present.  Although we will take a broad and essentially chronological approach, this is not simply the “same old story” with a different emphasis. We will reexamine some familiar historical events from a different perspective, but we will also focus on issues vital to the female experience (such as sexuality, reproduction, body image, gender construction, uncompensated labor, and domestic violence) that often get overlooked.  We will use primary texts to anchor our understandings of the arguments of the moment, and secondary texts to help us frame these concepts analytically.