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GENERAL EDUCATION: COMMON CORE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Comprehensive List Summer 2013 (Updated 03/6/2013)

Additional courses will be posted as they become available.

All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise noted.

 

CLICK ON THE COURSE NUMBER TO ACCESS CLASS TIMES

 

ART, AESTHETICS, AND CREATIVITY

ENG-A 399  ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY 

THE ART OF IMITATION: EXPERIMENTAL POETRY

One of the first practices artists learn is imitation, or the creation of an artistic work ‘after’ that of an established artist. In this course, students will be introduced to ‘experimental’ contemporary poetry—poetry that not only deviates from what would be considered the formal poetry that would be encountered in early British or American Literature survey courses, but also deviates from what might be considered more mainstream contemporary poetry that would be encountered in contemporary lit classes—which they will then be expected to imitate. Through close examination of the elements of craft in these poetic texts, we will determine what makes a poem ‘experimental,’ and establish criteria for what makes an experimental poem ‘successful.’ We will also view several ‘experimental’ (generally non-narrative or non-linear) films to help our understanding of how works that do not conform to traditional expectations of an audience function as cohesive works of art. By the end of the course, students will have a chapbook-length (12-24 pages) collection of experimental poems of their own.

FINA-A 190  ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY 

POINT AND SHOOT: AN INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

This introductory level course will explore digital technology for capturing, enhancing, and producing still lens-based images. The course will address the visual language of camera-generated images, computer output techniques, the connoisseurship of digital image output as well as basic digital camera operations. The course assumes no prior knowledge or experience with digital imaging technologies or materials. Students must provide a digital camera. TEXT:  Stone& London, A short Course in Digital Photography Prentice Hall, 2009. 

 

SOCIAL IMPACT OF PRINTMAKING

This course combines a survey of the social critiques of printmakers from 15th to 21st century, technical innovations and a studio practicum of printmaking processes.  The overview is intended to assist students in their appreciation and understanding of visual culture and political contexts as well as the technological changes of the media.  The “studio practice” provides “hand-on” demonstrations and engagement to investigate the technical and expressive processes of printmaking (including papermaking, relief printing, etching and multi-media design).  (F09 Nelson B)


 

VISUAL CULTURE-TECH&MEDIA

Study of our visual culture including photography, advertising, avatars, and video.


 

MUS-A 190  ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY

EXPLORING MUSICAL COMPOSITION  

This course will introduce students to the materials of music – pitch, rhythm, melody, harmony – and to the notational tools used by musicians to represent these materials. Throughout the semester each student will use the tools and skills learned to compose simple musical pieces. No previous music education is required.

 (Some sections offered for music majors only, permission required)

 

THTR-A 190  ART, AESTHETICS, & CREATIVITY  

INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE  

This introductory course examines the theatre, plays and playwriting, the actor, designers and technicians, the director, traditions of the theatre, the modern theatre, musical theatre, the future of theatre, and the critic. This is a participatory class.  

 

HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

BUS B 190 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Business organizations play an important role in our lives. We interact with businesses in a variety of ways, including as employees, consumers, and investors. One form of business organization—corporations—wield enormous power. Given the pervasiveness of business in our lives, one intention of this class is to help you make greater sense of the world in which you live and enable you to make better informed decisions.  In particular, W100 introduces you to a wide range of management issues. This will help to prepare you for other business classes that you may take and for your career. Or, for nonbusiness students, it will give you a useful overview of key business issues and the context within which businesses operate. Also this class may help you choose your career by making you aware of key features of: business trends, business ownership, business management, management of human resources, marketing, and managing financial resources.

POLS-B 399  HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS                                                                       (P: ENG-W 131) 

URBAN POLITICS AND POLICY

This course considers the politics of cities, suburbs, and regions in the United States from numerous perspectives. Cities are at the heart of American democracy; they are the units of government closest to the people, making citizens more likely to interact with their local governments than the national or a state government on a daily basis. However, cities also serve as hubs of commerce, and many argue their governments cater decisions to the interests of the private sector. Finding ways to serve residents while crafting development plans to suit businesses is one of the central challenges of governing cities. Because of cities’ dynamic and ever-changing nature, we will take a historical approach to urban politics while considering a wide range of theories of city development. Discussions of political power will be at the center of units considering the initial development of U.S. cities, political institutions, federalism, race, metropolitan expansion, globalization, and residential displacement. Though this is a course on politics, understanding the structure of power in cities requires inquiries going beyond the basic institutions of local government. Readings and discussions also borrow from sociology, urban planning, economics, geography, and a range of other disciplines.

 

PSY-B 190  HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

DEATH AND LIFE LESSONS                

This course focuses on death and end-of-life issues within a variety of perspectives, including historical, biomedical, multicultural, and religious theories. Existential issues related to the human significance of death for individuals and community will be addressed. Students will be introduced to a basic overview of laws and ethics regarding end-of-life issues, and participate in group discussions using critical thinking skills acquired in class. Guest speakers will include professionals working in funeral preparation, hospice, and grief and bereavement programs.

SOC-B 399 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS                                     (P: ENG-W 131)

SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES  

What are the elements of balanced, equitable development? Why are these so hard to achieve? Seeking answers to these questions will form the core of this seminar. We will look at what they mean for the various social problems facing the planet. Finally, we will look at efforts to forge alternative paths to development and quality of life. While we’re not likely to find a quick fix to any of the problems, we will also probe possible interventions to make a positive difference while seeking to build a more equitable, peaceful, and sustainable world. To analyze our changing planet we will draw on the social science disciplines of anthropology, sociology, geography, political science, and economics.  We will also consider the insights and background offered by psychology, history, and ecology. 


SPCH-S 322 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS (NUMBER SHOULD CHANGE TO B399)

DECEPTION AND LYING

Traditionally, communication courses explore the hows and whys of human communication. The field of interpersonal communication tends to focus on theories, skills and abilities that would help students improve their working relationships, from romantic relationships to co-workers. But there's more to communication than just the "good side." What about lies? Deception? Manipulation? These are key areas of study that need to be understood, much the same as we discuss effective and productive communication characteristics.

With this said, we will be studying the "dark side" of communication. We will depart from the norm and focus on the art of deception, lying, deception, truth telling and acceptable forms of deception (poker anyone?). Likewise, we will cover hoaxers and con artists: those "professional liars" in our communities. In doing this, my goal is to better prepare students to become critical receivers of messages: both the "good" and the "bad" (however we end up defining these monikers).

WGS-B 399 HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS (was WOST B399)

RACE & REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS

This course examines how race and class have shaped women’s access to birth control, their ability to make reproductive choices and to have control over their own bodies. We will discuss a number of themes – both current and historical. This course will start with a look at childbearing and –raising in slave communities and on Native American reservations. We will then continue with a discussion of a variety of case studies that exemplify how the U.S. government has limited the reproductive rights and choices of certain communities over the last century. Topics include forced sterilization, the eugenics movements, the mistreatment of single mothers in the early 20th century, and medical experiments on communities of color.  In the second half of the semester, we will turn our attention to current controversies, incl. teenagers’ access to sex education and birth control, the debate about emergency contraception and abortion, gay and lesbian parents, as well as new reproductive technologies and their ethical implications. We will also discuss how women have acted, individually and collectively, to fight oppression and create community.

 

THE NATURAL WORLD

 

ANTH-N 190  THE NATURAL WORLD

BECOMING HUMAN

An introduction to the evolutionary development of humans, viewed in both a biological and cultural context. Major topics include the concept of evolution, biological relationships between humans and other primates, the fossil record of hominid evolution, and the basic methods employed by archaeologists in the study of human biological and social development.

 

AST-N 190  THE NATURAL WORLD                                                                                       (MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 3)

STARS AND GALAXIES

Our universe is a vast place that contains a variety of objects that almost defy the imagination. This course is a journey that starts from our extended local neighborhood of nearby stars, continues to explore our galaxy and its inhabitants, and ends at the far reaches of known space. Along the way we will discover strange objects such as pulsars, black holes, and exploding galaxies, and we will face some of the remaining deep mysteries about the structure of the universe that occupy today's cosmologists.

 

CHEM-N 190  THE NATURAL WORLD

CHEMISTRY AND OUR ENVIRONMENT

The course focuses on topical, interdisciplinary issues such as the environment, energy, and nutrition.  The science is introduced on a need-to-know basis as issues are discussed and developed.  There are no pre-requisites for this course. Instruction will focus on only those aspects of the fundamentals of chemistry that have a direct bearing on the applications of chemistry to society.


 

GEOL-N 190  THE NATURAL WORLD                                                                                       (MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 3)

GEOLOGY OF THE NATIONAL PARKS

Our national and state parks contain some of the most beautiful scenery found on the planet, and accordingly draw visitors from around the world. Their spectacular landscapes are the result of a wide range of geologic processes that we will discuss in this course. After introducing the basic framework of plate tectonics we will use individual parks as geologic case studies and introduce geological principles as necessary to scientifically understand what gives the parks their unique character. We will also discuss the political and historical framework in which the park system exists: the establishment and management of national and state parks is a massive undertaking including extensive political, philosophical and economic considerations.

 

ROCKS, GEMS AND FOSSILS

Rocks, gems, and fossils have intrigued people from the beginning.  Through basic identification of rocks and minerals, students will learn how the history of our planet has been interpreted.  Emphasis on the uses of these materials will show students how many natural resources we extract from our planet and how this process has affected the development of countries and civilizations around the world. By learning about the identification, classification, and formation of fossils, students will learn about our past here in Indiana, North America, and planet Earth.

EARTH AND SPACE                                                                               (P: Math 014 or MATH PLACEMENT LEVEL 3)

This course will teach the basic concepts of Physical Geology, with an emphasis on rocks, minerals, earthquakes, volcanoes, and Plate Tectonics. The Historical Geology portion looks at interpreting Earth's history with Relative Dating, and the identification of many fossils and how they form.  Also, an introduction into the basics of Astronomy and Meteorology.


LITERARY AND INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

ENG-T 190  LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                                  (Reading Placement, 90 or above)       

EVERYBODY’S IRISH: UNCOVERING PLASTIC PADDYS AND “REAL” IRISHMEN

Whatever happened to the Ireland of thatch cottages, fairies, giants, wakes, and dances? “Modern” Irishmen and women have been asking this question as far back as the nineteenth century when the Irish countryside was being transformed by the introduction of the English language and culture, and most importantly, the setting down of stories told around the fireside into print. This course will explore how some of the first Irish authors in English were able to capture the tall tales and voices of the last of the traditional Irish storytellers in writing. Most of our current views of the Irish come from these early stories, but how accurate is the stereotype of the poor, drunk, short-tempered, yet lovable Paddy? We will read literature and historical accounts, as well as watch selections from films such as The Quiet Man and Darby O’Gill and the Little People, to discover the complex image of the Irishman in print and how it has been manipulated and reproduced over time to create the “real” Irish.


Leaders and Deciders

This course explores concepts of leadership with reference to great works of literature, history, and religious writing. We'll contrast leadership with mere decision-making and assess how decisions affect leadership outcomes.  By exploring traditional perceptions of heroes as leaders and contemporary theories of management, we will see how motivation, moral authority, time and place, social status, concern for ethical behavior, money and power, and other factors affect the choices of Oedipus, Antigone, and Creon from Greek tragedy; Moses and Jesus from the Bible; Shakespeare’s Hamlet; and businessmen from Edith Wharton’s Age of Innocence and Ibsen’s Doll’s House

MEXICAN LITERATURE AND CINEMA

This class will take place on the IUSB campus and at the Instituto Cultural Oaxaca in Oaxaca, Mexico.  An examination of Mexican cinema and literature will complement the course of language study and immersion experience students will also embark on.  We will study film form, literary traditions, and cultural expressions as found in Mexican films, novels and short stories, and crafts.  We will also pay attention to the use of language in the films and novels, and the role of translation. 

STORIES OF THE DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILY  (formerly The Dysfunctional Family in Literature)  

The course focuses on the repetitive pattern of dysfunction in family groups from the ancient Greeks to modern writers. The class will analyze the causes of socially dysfunctional actions and the effects on family members and the surrounding society. We’ll study dysfunctional characters in literary works and film with the help of some psychological texts. We will examine the difficulty of breaking out of dysfunction and investigate ethical consequences of characters’ actions. How are the destructive consequences of dysfunctional acts treated by the authors in this course? How does modern society view such acts? Can dysfunctional acts be explained away by fate or birth? Where does responsibility reside?  


ENG-T 390 LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                                                                                      (P: ENG-W131)

THE COMMERCIAL REVOLUTION AND THE RISE OF THE NOVEL

In this class, we will examine how England responded to the crisis of identity wrought by the commercial revolution of the eighteenth century and how the literature of the time attempted to offer solutions to this crisis. In the early eighteenth century, money was quickly replacing social rank as the basis for power and prestige. As one shopkeeper of the time put it, “I can buy a gentleman, therefore I am a gentleman.” While this transformation produced a new sense of social equality, it also suggested the disturbing notion that one’s identity was based on what one owned rather than on any inherent attributes. A new luxury market promoted this consumer mentality by offering a wider array of goods than ever before and invented new techniques, such as advertisements and window displays, to make these goods appealing. One of the new luxury items that consumers purchased and used to define themselves was the novel—a form of literature that focused on workaday life and made everyday people the heroes of its plots. In doing so, the novel served as a device for analyzing the new commercial world and its effects on society. It also helped to shape, and was shaped by, attitudes towards this world. Novels will include: Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Samuel Richardson, Pamela; Tobias Smollett, Humphrey Clinker; Henry McKenzie, The Man of Feeling; and Frances Burney, Evelina. We will frame our discussions of the novels through selections from the sociologists Max Weber and Pierre Bourdieu, as well as period sources by the philosophers John Locke, David Hume, and Adam Smith.

MEXICAN LITERATURE AND CINEMA

This class will take place on the IUSB campus and at the Instituto Cultural Oaxaca in Oaxaca, Mexico.  An    examination of Mexican cinema and literature will complement the course of language study and immersion experience students will also embark on.  We will study film form, literary traditions, and cultural expressions as found in Mexican films, novels and short stories, and crafts.  We will also pay attention to the use of language in the films and novels, and the role of translation. 

MUS-T 190  LITERARY & INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS                                (Reading Placement, 90 or above) 

EXPLORING MUSICAL GENRES: CLASSICAL MUSIC & BEYOND

This course explores the elements and performing media of music using live music, recorded music, and video. The role of music in society at different times in history in both Western and non-Western culture will be examined. Students will be expected to attend classical music concerts, and to develop the listening skills needed to write critically about their concert experience and other music experienced in the course.

HISTORY OF ROCK AND ROLL   (also titled Exploring Musical Genres: Rock N Roll, and Rock and Roll Music)             

This course explores history of rock and roll, from its roots in American jazz and blues in the early twentieth century, to its most contemporary manifestations. The method for studying rock and roll in this course is to examine it as a logical result of American societal trends and cultural mores of the era.  As such, Music T-190; The History of Rock and Roll is as much a look at American society and its values as it is a music course.  The ability to read music is not required.  A term paper and two examinations (mid-term and final) are the course evaluators. Students need not have any formal training in music to benefit from this course.