Skip to main site navigation
Skip to main content
Switch to text-only view
Switch to default view

Dr. Matthew Shockey

Matthew Shockey, Ph.D.
Wiekamp Hall, Room DW3281
(574) 520-5545
shockey2@iusb.edu

Mailing Address:
Department of Philosophy
Indiana University South Bend
1700 Mishawaka Avenue
PO Box 7111
South Bend, IN  46634-7111

Background

Prof. Shockey joined the faculty of IU South Bend in the fall of 2007, having previously taught at the University of Pittsburgh, Grand Valley State University, and Kalamazoo College.

Teaching Interests        

Prof. Shockey teaches a variety of courses in the history of philosophy, focusing mainly on the modern period (17th-19th centuries), and in 20 century European philosophy. He also regularly teaches courses that contribute to the campus-wide General Education program, including introductory-level courses that meet the campus-wide Critical Thinking requirement and an upper-level course on environmental philosophy.

 Research Interests

Prof. Shockey’s research focuses on conceptions of selfhood and subjectivity in the modern tradition, particularly in the work of Rene Descartes, Nicolas Malebranche, John Locke, Immanuel Kant, and Martin Heidegger. He has published a number of articles, most of which deal with Heidegger’s analysis of human existence and the role of that analysis in grounding an account of what it means in general for things to be. He is currently working on a number of articles on Heidegger, Malebranche, Locke and Kant, as well as a book manuscript on Heidegger: The Bounds of Self: An Essay on Being and Time. Additionally, he co-founded in 2012 (with Clinton Tolley at UC, San Diego, and James Reid, at Metropolitan State University of Denver) the Seminar in Phenomenology and the History of Philosophy (SIPHOP) and organized the first meeting in South Bend in September of 2012 on “Kant and the Founding of Phenomenology.”

(University of Chicago, 2004), Assistant Professor, history of modern philosophy, phenomenology and existentialism, environmental philosophy