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Course Schedules

Summer Session One 2014 Women's and Gender Studies Classes

See online schedule for class sections, times, and locations at:

http://www.ius.edu/soc-iusb/semesters/summer-2014/departments/wgs?ss=1

 

WGS-S 338 Sociology of Gender Roles (3 cr)

MW 1-4:15 pm (Lucal)

This course will provide an overview of current sociological approaches to understanding gender.  We will focus on topics related to a range of genders, including femininity, masculinity, trans* and genderqueer.  Students will be expected to read, discuss and write about gender in a variety of contexts. 

WGS-W 100 Introduction to Gender Studies (3 cr)

MW 9 am-12:15 pm (Lidinsky)

Must boys be boys?  Must girls be girls?  This introductory, interdisciplinary course examines the complex relations between biological sex and cultural constructions of masculinity and femininity.  We will take up the interrelated questions of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality.  This course will provide students with the tools developed within the frameworks of feminist social and political analysis, women’s history, and histories and theories of sexuality.

Fulfills the Diversity in U.S. Society general education requirement.

WGS-W 301 International Perspectives on Women (3 cr)

TR 9 am-12:15 pm (Gerken)

This course will explore contemporary women’s voices and experiences from a global perspective. We will examine current issues and debates about globalization as a gendered phenomenon and make connections between gendered ideologies, local concerns, transnational migrations, and global capitalism. Throughout the semester, we will discuss how colonialism, racism, classism, sexism, and heterosexism have shaped the lives of women across the world and how women have acted to fight oppression and create community, both locally and through supra-national organizations.

Fulfills Contemporary Social Values: Non-Western Cultures gen ed requirement.


Fall 2014 Women's and Gender Studies Classes

See online schedule for class sections, times, and locations at:

http://www.ius.edu/soc-iusb/semesters/fall-2014/departments/wgs

WGS B399 Human Behavior & Social Institutions: Women and Madness (3 cr.)

TR 11:30–12:45 pm (Borshuk)

This class focuses on the iconic mad woman in historical and fictional works, and examines through a psychological and gendered analysis how this portrayal has been constructed. We will look at how centuries of bias against women in Western societies have resulted in the pathologizing of women’s sexual, mental, emotional, and physical experiences and abilities. We will examine old and new gender stereotypes that have led to disparate treatment by the psychological profession. We will read first-person accounts from women who have undergone mental health treatments such as insane asylums, biological therapies, and talk therapies. We will also turn a critical eye toward the portrayal of dangerous, mad, or crazy women in works of fiction and film to explore themes of sexuality, motherhood, agency, and relationships.

WGS BE190 First Year Experience

TR 1–2:15 pm (Chaney) & TR 11:30-12:45 pm (Lidinsky) [linked course]

WGS T190 Sex Wars and Other Social Revolutions - Reacting to the Past

TR 11:30- 12:45 pm (Lidinsky)

This class will examine and engage with moments of potential change in the recent history of the United States: the sexual and social revolutions of the late 19th century, and the suffrage, labor and bohemian movements in 1910-1917. We will be asking several questions: What factors led to people demanding a change in the laws and customs that governed their lives, who were those who wanted changes and what did they do about it, and how did these people have an impact on our lives today?  The course requires consistent reading of primary texts from this period, and consistent short writing assignments that allow students to strengthen their critical reading and writing skills.  A few weeks of the course will use a game-based approach to learning called “Reacting to the Past,” with students enacting debates from the period while in character as people from that historical moment.  This game-based role-playing may feel a bit unusual, but students have enjoyed the opportunity to experience the energy and passion of the time period, while developing their speaking skills through deep engagement with the course materials.  

WGS H260 History of American Women

MW 11:30 – 12:45 pm (Tetzlaff)

 This course covers American women from 1607 to the present. It focuses on changes in women’s lives in the areas of health, education, work, family, etc. We will also look at the ways women shaped U.S. history through social movements and politics. Race, class, sexuality, and religion, as well as gender will all inform our analysis. Response papers and a brief research paper are required.

WGS P391 Psych of Race, Gender & Ethnicity (joint-listed as PSY P391)

MW 10-11:15 am (De Bryant)

In this course we will explore passions. Not just Eros, although we will certainly look at passion as sexual. During the semester we will mull over questions about gaining and losing control over passions. We will explore the cultural construction of sexuality; personality development and coping; spirituality, religion, and sexuality; friendships, relationships, and marriage within and between races; death and dying, natural and violent; aging and the choices for living; definitions of ‘motherhood’ and ‘family’. We will look at the elements in our lives which move beyond (in some cases far beyond) our boundaries of control. We will explore social and political forces that direct us and shape our lives with or without our consent. We will look at psychological services and how to decide when "passion" has become "deviance," when race does matter, and when gender is more than a checkmark on the intake form.

WGS W100 Gender Studies

MW 2:30–3:45 pm (Staff)

 Must boys be boys?  Must girls be girls?  This introductory, interdisciplinary course examines the complex relations between biological sex and cultural constructions of masculinity and femininity.  We will take up the interrelated questions of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality.  This course will provide students with the tools developed within the frameworks of feminist social and political analysis, women’s history, and histories and theories of sexuality.

Fulfills the Diversity in U.S. Society general education requirement.

 WGS W240 Telling Truths – The Art & Craft of the Monologue (1 cr.)

Saturday 10-12:15 pm (1st 6 Saturdays of semester; class held at the Civil Rights Heritage Center on W. Washington St.) (Snyder)

NEW! This interdisciplinary course will develop the ability to write and present monologues about participant’s life experiences. Gender, sexuality, race, and ethnic will be examined. Storytelling technique, English phonetics, and English pronunciation will be explored. Three 600-word monologues from three different perspectives will be written; one will be presented during the final class. Final project: an 800-to 1,000-word reflection paper.

WGS W299 Feminist Research Methods

MW 10–11:15 (Lidinsky)

*Required for majors/minors

This course will introduce students to a range of qualitative research methods. We will discuss the epistemological assumptions underlying research in traditional disciplines and explore feminist adaptations, critiques, and revisions. This course will function as a workshop: students are not only expected to read and discuss research, but also to do it! You cannot fully understand the challenges of conducting feminist research unless you begin to conduct interviews, observe social practice, and analyze documents for yourself. Your own experiences in the field will be the backbone of our discussions.

WGS W302 Issues in Gender Studies

MW 4-5:15 pm (Rusnock)

Women in Medieval Society (3 cr.)

New! An overview of the history of women in Europe during the Medieval period will be examined. The situation of women will be addressed according to their position in society - whether it be noblewomen, queen, peasant, saint, or prostitute – and analyzed within the social, cultural, political, and intellectual contexts of the Middle Ages. Students will analyze how women both responded to, and at the same time affected, Medieval society.

WGS W302 Issues in Gender Studies

TR 4-5:15 pm (Foley)

New! Selected topics in the anthropology of gender. Focus includes contemporary and classic debates concerning the construction of gender within cultural, biological, and archaeological anthropology. A focus on studies concerning gendered division of labor, knowledge, and behavior; mating, sexuality, and reproduction, archaeological interpretation, and evolving cultural and scientific trends. 

WGS W302 Gender & Communication (joint-listed as SPCH 450)

M 11:30-2 pm (Joyce)

Examines the extent to which sex, gender roles and gender stereotypes influence the process of communication. We will focus on gender differences in verbal and nonverbal behavior, development of sex roles, cultural assumption, and stereotypes regarding gender differences in communication. This course will specifically focus its analyses on how the mass media present, influence, and construct gender in different cultural and international contexts. P: W131

WGS W402 Contested Sexualities

MW 1-2:15 pm (Lucal)

New! This is a new seminar (joint-listed with Sociology) that will examine a variety of contested sexualities, including polyamory, interracial relationships, bisexuality, and BDSM. Because this is a seminar, students also will do research on a contested sexuality of their choice.

WGS W480 Practicum

Arranged (Lidinsky)

Required for majors, and restricted to majors who are in their senior year. Contact Dr. Lidinsky for more details.

WGS W495 Readings & Research in Gender Studies

Arranged (Lidinsky)